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Learn about the Lexington-Fayette County candidates for mayor and at-large and district council seats!

2018 General Election Voter Guide

It’s important for voters to understand where candidates stand on the most pressing growth issues facing our community. That’s why AARP Kentucky, Fayette Alliance, Fayette County Farm Bureau, Fayette County Neighborhood Council, Kentucky Thoroughbred Association, the Lexington Public Library, and WKYT partnered to help voters learn more about the candidates before the upcoming election on Tuesday, November 6, 2018.

Candidates are listed in ballot order and were restricted to responses of no more than 250 words. Find out what district you are in on the LFUCG website.

View Questionnaire Responses By Candidate:

2018 Mayoral Candidates (arranged in ballot-order):

Linda Gorton
Ronnie Bastin

2018 Primary At-Large Council Seat Candidates (arranged in ballot-order):

Lillie E. Miller-Johnson
Steve Kay*
Connie Kell- Did not complete questionnaire
Richard Moloney*
Adrian Wallace- Did not complete questionnaire
Chuck Ellinger, II

Urban County Council Seat Candidates (arranged in ballot-order):

District 1:
Anita Rowe Franklin- Did not complete questionnaire
James Brown*

District 2:
Josh McCurn- Did not complete questionnaire
Joseph Smith*

District 3:
J. “Jake” Gibbs*
Renee Jackson Shepard

District 4:
Barry Saturday
Susan Lamb*

District 5:
Liz Sheehan
Bill Farmer, Jr.*

District 6:
Gabriel Wilburn- Did not complete questionnaire
Angela Evans*

District 7:
Preston Worley*
Chris Logan

District 8:
Christian J. Motley
Fred V. Brown*- Did not complete questionnaire

District 9:
Jacob Glancy
Jennifer Mossotti*

District 10:
Amanda Mays Bledsoe*- Running unopposed

District 11:
Sandy Shafer
Jennifer Reynolds

District 12:
Monteia Mundy Owenby
Kathy Plomin*

*Incumbent


 

View Candidate Responses by Question

1. Do you support prioritizing infill/redevelopment as Lexington’s primary growth strategy? Under what circumstances would you support expansion of the Urban Services Boundary or Rural Activity Centers?

View Mayoral Candidate Responses

View At-Large Council Candidate Responses

View District Council Candidate Responses

2. What specific recommendations do you have to protect the character and context of existing neighborhoods while diversifying our housing stock to meet the needs of our community?

View Mayoral Candidate Responses

View At-Large Council Candidate Responses

View District Council Candidate Responses

3. What specific recommendations do you have to address Lexington’s affordable housing issue?

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View At-Large Council Candidate Responses

View District Council Candidate Responses

4. The number of households headed by someone aged 65 or older is projected to increase significantly over the next decade and beyond. What specific recommendations do you have to meet the needs of our growing senior population?

View Mayoral Candidate Responses

View At-Large Council Candidate Responses

View District Council Candidate Responses

5. Do you support an annual funding allocation for Lexington’s Purchase of Development Rights Program (PDR)? Please list your specific ideas to support the continued strength and growth of our agricultural and tourism industries.

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View At-Large Council Candidate Responses

View District Council Candidate Responses

6. Citizens have noted frustration with traffic congestion. What are your specific ideas to address traffic congestion?

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View At-Large Council Candidate Responses

View District Council Candidate Responses

7. The 2018 Comprehensive Plan for Lexington includes a goal to create “a new process for determining long-term land use decisions” involving the Urban Services Boundary and Rural Activity Centers. If you support the creation of this new process, what are some of the elements that should be included?

View Mayoral Candidate Responses

View At-Large Council Candidate Responses

View District Council Candidate Responses

8 a. For district candidates—What is the biggest challenge facing your district? What are your specific recommendations to address that challenge? For county-wide candidates—What is the biggest challenge facing Lexington? What are your specific recommendations to address that challenge?

View District Council Candidate Responses

8 b. For county-wide candidates only—What is the biggest challenge facing Lexington? What are your specific recommendations to address that challenge?

View Mayoral Candidate Responses

View At-Large Council Candidate Responses


1. Do you support prioritizing infill/redevelopment as Lexington’s primary growth strategy? Under what circumstances would you support expansion of the Urban Services Boundary or Rural Activity Centers?

Urban County Mayor:

  • Linda Gorton- Efficient and strategic use of land inside the Urban Services Boundary is sustainable and fiscally responsible. I support Infill/Redevelopment as are our primary long-range growth strategy. Comprehensive Plan: The recently adopted Goals of the 2018 Comprehensive Plan recommend no expansion of the USB and continued focus on infill/redevelopment. I strongly support this decision. Balance: The USB has ensured a balanced approach to growth that has helped us largely avoid the negative and expensive consequences of sprawl development. The USB has enabled our city to become increasingly more vibrant, while ensuring our signature agricultural industries thrive. I am committed to continuing to focus right now on development/redevelopment inside the USB to maintain our signature, productive landscape and increase the vitality of our city. Momentum: We must continue the extraordinary momentum our city is experiencing downtown and bring that energy to other parts of our city as well. By focusing energy inside the USB, we have enabled our city and our agricultural industries to grow and thrive. I will keep our community moving forward. Intentionality: Sustainable growth means intentional growth. Citizens must have access to information and opportunities for input. Infill/redevelopment projects should enhance our community and be done in a transparent and inclusive way. Access to green spaces and better infrastructure for walking and biking must be prioritized in development projects.
  • Ronnie Bastin- We must be smart about future growth. Lexington is a city people want to move to. We know growth is going to happen, so we must plan for it. To date, Lexington planning officials have been innovative in some of their approaches to growth. This is evidenced by the defined growth boundary, the PDR program, which has been in operation since 1958. I will support the exploration of incentives for infill and redevelopment projects within the Urban Services Area. I am interested in looking at incentives for development as well as buyer incentives to increase demand in areas targeted for infill development and redevelopment. I will work closely with the LFUCG Planning staff to follow agreed upon goals, as outlined in the 2018 Comprehensive Plan. I believe that inclusion of all stakeholders in the conversations about smart growth, infill projects and expansion is vital to make sure unanticipated consequences—such as gentrification—are avoided.

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Urban County Council At-Large:
* Incumbent

  • Lillie E. Miller-Johnson- I would support infill/redevelopment as long as the character and context of our existing neighborhoods are maintained. I do not believe we should be like every other city that has used infill and lost the character of their city. That is our tourist attraction and part of our character as a city. As far as Urban services boundary or Rural activity centers, I would again have to look at what we would be losing, which areas that the expansions would be in. But as a member of the Council I would not have the last say but I sure would be trying to bring other ideas to the table at that time, if I did not support what expansion that was going on.
  • Steve Kay*– Infill and redevelopment must be Lexington’s primary growth strategy if we are to retain the remarkable balance between rural and urban that makes our community unique and serves for many as a key component of a positive quality of life. As a longtime member and now Chair of the Infill and Redevelopment Committee I have worked to make changes in regulations, policies, and procedures that support infill and redevelopment and make those projects easier to do. Some strategies are broadly applicable These include reducing parking requirements, coupling development with available or projected mass transit, favoring increased density, promoting mixed-use development. But our overall strategy needs to be fine-grained attention to the opportunities and challenges presented by conditions within differing locales. Going forward, I will be as involved as possible in the development of the “new process” outlined in the recently approved Goals and Objectives of the Comprehensive Plan Update. My hope is that that effort will result in a broad community consensus about where, if anywhere, and when, if ever, and under what conditions expansion of the Urban Services Boundary or Rural Activity Centers should be proposed. Absent that consensus, and absent an understanding of how any proposed expansion fits the long-term social, cultural, and economic needs of the community, I believe an expansion would not be justified. Land is a finite resource and must be treated as such in any policy considerations.
  • Connie Kell- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Richard Moloney*-I voted to adopt the Goals and Objectives of the 2018 Comprehensive Plan, which prioritize infill and redevelopment as our growth strategy. In general, I do not support expansion of the Urban Services Boundary or Rural Activity Centers except for the areas that are along our interstates where infrastructure and sewer capacity already exist.
  • Adrian Wallace- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Chuck Ellinger, II.- The responsibility of the Council is to update the Goals and Objectives of the Comprehensive Plan every five years. I have been fortunate to be a part of this update process in the past. The newly adopted Plan prioritizes infill/redevelopment to accommodate growth needs. Since we are considered, “The Horse Capital of the World “, we must protect what makes us unique. The rural services boundary is preservation of this uniqueness and protects the character of Fayette County. The Council added a Goal to the Comprehensive Plan that asks for identifying land for potential future urban development. The Mayor will appoint a committee that will develop a RFP to hire a consultant to lead a study to recommend the process. These factors that trigger thresholds to adding land to the USB must be vetted well in order to have smart, responsible growth. They need to look at population growth, demographics, diversity, corridor utilization, affordable housing, mixed use development and maximum use of land to name just a few.

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Urban County District Council:
*Inbumbent

District 1-

  • Anita Rowe Franklin- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • James Brown*- I do support prioritizing infill/redevelopment as our city’s primary growth strategy. I support the concept of the city’s development of a new process to determine long term land use, which should help as a tool in deciding when and where expansion should occur in Lexington.

District 2-

  • Josh McCurn- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Joseph Smith*- I believe in identifying areas of opportunity for infill, redevelopment, adaptive reuse, and mixed-use development. We need to respect the context and design features of areas surrounding development projects and develop design standards and guidelines to ensure compatibility with existing urban form. Incorporating adequate greenspace and open space into all development projects will better serve the needs of the intended population. Implementing innovative programs, such as the public infrastructure fund and land bank programs is essential to facilitating sustainable development, including, but not limited to, housing affordable at all income levels and commercial and economic activity. Equally important is developing materials and implementing programs to educate the public about infill and redevelopment.
    In addition, I believe another essential element is the consideration of the complexity of maintaining a balance between Planning for Urban Uses and Safeguarding Rural Land. The mutual goal is to uphold the Urban Service Area concept by continuing to monitor the absorption of vacant and underutilized land within the Urban Service Area, while requiring intense and sustainable development of all types within the Urban Service Area to accommodate future growth needs and safeguard rural land. I believe we can emphasize intense redevelopment of underutilized corridors, maximize development on vacant land within the Urban Service Area and promote redevelopment of underutilized land. By pursuing these strategies, I believe we can activate large underdeveloped landholdings within the Urban Service Area and ultimately achieve the goal of upholding the Urban Service Area concept in the 2018 Comprehensive Plan.

District 3-

  • J. “Jake” Gibbs*- I serve on the LFUCG Infill/Redevelopment Committee and I absolutely support its goals. It will be very hard for me to support any expansion. I may support a bit of expansion in areas can be demonstrated to be non-essential to our rural economy. If I did support that, it would be one-time and never again.
  • Renee Jackson Shepard- I do support infill/redevelopment as our primary growth strategy. There are many parcels of vacant, blighted or underutilized property in the 3rd District alone. I am eager to see what recommendations the “new process” cited in Q7 makes to determine triggers for expansion. I think this new process is critical to our community so we can grow in a smart, data-driven manner. Understanding what the carry capacity of both our infill and current vacant land within the Urban Services Boundary would be an appropriate start to this end. Then developing tools, such as an optimal land absorption plan really allow data driven decisions to be made.

District 4-

  • Barry Saturday- Infill and redevelopment is a natural process of economic growth that is important for revitalizing areas whose potential has become underutilized. Prioritizing infill and redevelopment has a downside, however, and Lexington is currently experiencing this in a major way. When the only way for a city to grow is up, low-priced land is purchased and redeveloped; this is often called gentrification. By buying up low-cost land, the gentrification effect turns previously affordable housing in the area into more expensive housing, which has a negative effect on the ability of those with lower economic means to afford to live there, even if their family has lived in the area for generations.
    I would continue infill, but allow a smart approach to expansion to occur as well. Expansion would depress housing costs, which will continue to make living in Lexington a possibility for those with limited means. For more on affordable housing, see my answer to question 3.
  • Susan Lamb*- I do support prioritizing infill/redevelopment and believe we need to have intentional discussions with our neighborhoods about infill/redevelopment property. I would like to work with city planners and neighborhoods to identify what infill/redevelopment property looks like within our neighborhoods. Once we are able to recognize it, then we can discuss what type of development can be considered and how that could benefit or impact our neighborhoods. Having these discussions early on would be beneficial to neighborhoods so they can collaborate more when infill/redevelopment projects come forward. With expansion of the Urban Service Boundary, we must identify proper infrastructure such as capacity of sanitary sewers, storm sewers and roads for connectivity. Also, with new development comes expansion of services such as garbage and refuse collection, more areas for police patrol and fire stations. Public transportation is another important component for new development especially if you develop residential with accessories such as restaurants and retail shopping.

District 5-

  • Liz Sheehan- Infill and redevelopment efforts should be prioritized, especially high density housing, multi-use and multi-level buildings within the current boundary. Within that development, a priority must be addressing our housing shortage. We still have land to develop from the last expansion in 1996. I would consider expansion if we have exhausted our other options first. We need thoughtful development accounting for environmental impact, the agriculture and horse industry, and tourism, which are important to our region’s economy and identity.
  • Bill Farmer, Jr.*- I do not support a single strategy answer. I would not expand Rural Activity Centers & would consider boundary revisions only after the new study is complete and vetted.

District 6-

  • Gabriel Williams- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Angela Evans*- I support utilizing under developed property for it most effective & needed purposes. It has been my observation that having one method as the PRIMARY strategy is impacting districts like the 6th, more drastically than others. So the redevelpment that occurs must be very thoughtful and sensitive to the surrounding area.

District 7-

  • Preston Worley*- Yes. We must protect and preserve our farmland while creatively addressing the housing needs of our rapidly growing population. In my opinion, Lexington is the most unique City in the country because of our rural landscape and surroundings, particularly our signature horse farms. Accordingly, conservation of farmland is key to our future planning and development. At the same time we have to acknowledge that our city’s needs will eventually outgrow our boundary despite our best efforts at infill. I would only support expansion of the Urban Services Boundary when that day is upon us, as conservatively as possible, and using deliberately planned out processes and criteria for how, when, where, and why we expand.
  • Chris Logan- Being a good steward of the land we already have available ensures a smart growth plan for Lexington. Infill and redevelopment must be a major part of that plan. Expansion of the Urban Service Boundary should only be considered after all other options have been exhausted and certain growth criteria are met.

District 8-

  • Christian J. Motley- As Lexington’s population grows, the question is not if we grow, but how. And in this critical moment, the decisions we make today determine what our city will look like for decades to come. We must be both conscious stewards and champions, recognizing the tools available to us to manage a smart growth strategy. With over 17,000 acres of vacant, undeveloped and underutilized land inside the Urban Services Boundary, I believe that Lexington should prioritize infill and redevelopment as laid out in the Goals and Objectives of the 2018 Comprehensive Plan. I would support incentives, particularly for projects that promote housing affordability and inclusionary design.
  • Fred V. Brown*- Did not complete questionnaire.

District 9-

  • Jacob Glancy- This is yet another issue that has become unnecessarily polarizing. We need to work together to come up with common sense solutions that respect and utilize the land we already posses while incorporating free market growth.
  • Jennifer Mossotti*- Yes, land use efficiency and infill need to be our key objective. I believe we have an adequate inventory of land inside the USB at present to support our short-term growth. The Comprehensive Plan is the guiding blueprint for how our unique city grows. The American Planning Association estimates that more than one-hundred metropolitan areas now have some form of urban containment strategy. It’s simply smart business. Lexington is a leader of such planning and enjoys the oldest growth boundary in the United States, dating all the way back to 1958. Over the years, Lexington’s growth boundary has been adjusted as necessary. I am proud of my input on and support of the Goals and Objectives for our 2018 Comprehensive Plan. Through unprecedented public input in developing the plan, it was overwhelmingly evident that many people did not want expansion. Expansion of the USB would be justified only if there is an effective, affordable housing plan in place, our underutilized corridors are redeveloped, and maximum land used within the boundary is achieved that is satisfactory to everyone’s overall quality of life. We must fight sprawl into our signature Bluegrass farmland. Our farmland is finite. Over time, the boundaries may need to be adjusted to meet changing conditions, but I do not believe we have reached that threshold.

District 10-

  • Amanda Mays Bledsoe*- Running Unopposed

District 11-

  • Sandy Shafer- Fayette County has a finite land resource and we must be very careful in how we use it. I do support Infill and Redevelopment as one of the growth strategies when used with other planning techniques. That would include the urban services boundary concept, the rural land management plan, mixed-use development and adaptive re-uses. I would consider expansion only after a complete review of areas that can be used for infill or redeveloped or re-use.
  • Jennifer Reynolds*- Yes, I favor prioritizing infill and redevelopment as a primary growth strategy. I believe in making efficient use of our current urban service boundary before we expand any further. As a city we must continue development within our current boundary in order to accommodate the rapid growth we are experiencing, and I support infill and redevelopment projects if and when they take the surrounding residents into consideration, are thoughtfully planned, and do not force longtime residents and business owners out of their homes. The 11th District has an Oxford Circle Feasibility Study because residents have identified Oxford Circle’s need for revitalization. I think plans are a good idea when possible in order to communicate with residents about the type of development they want for their own community and the plans should be implemented. At the same time we should be protecting our unique, beautiful farmland so that we can continue with our successful equine and agrarian industries. A lack of developable space and need for more affordable housing would be the main reasons I could think of that would cause me to reconsider an expansion of the boundary someday in the future.

District 12-

  • Monteia Mundy Owenby- Infill/redevelopment is Lexington’s primary growth strategy, as voted on by the current City Council. I am aware of a study that is being done to review the housing needs of Lexington and to determine when or where the Urban Services Boundary can be expanded. I am anxious to learn the results of the study. As someone who lives on a farm, I would never want to see Lexington lose its unique character.
  • Kathy Plomin*- Infill and redevelopment must be our number one priority in addressing Lexington’s growth needs. There are over 15,000 vacant, underutilized or blighted acres within our Urban Service Area. We must access this available land and look at creative and effective ways for refill and development. With that said many of our developers will share that it is more cumbersome and more expensive for them to re- develop inside the USB. I am a member of both of the existing Infill and redevelopment committees. These committees must accelerate our efforts and engage in more meaningful and consensus driven conversations to take the next steps to make infill and redevelopment more attractive development options. The 12th District is directly impacted by growth outside the USB. The district is home to our signature horse farms, farm land and natural resources. That is why it is critical to make infill and redevelopment a priority for our community. Future growth outside the USB should be cautiously approached and we should devise a formula for consideration as to inside USB capacity and future growth needs.

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2. What specific recommendations do you have to protect the character and context of existing neighborhoods while diversifying our housing stock to meet the needs of our community?

Urban County Mayor:

  • Linda Gorton- Lexington’s neighborhoods are the foundation of our city. I am committed to supporting policies to ensure all our neighborhoods succeed Transparency and Inclusivity: Neighbors must be involved early in the development process and have easy access to information. I will create more inclusive processes and make it easier to access information. Using existing resources, I will create a Neighborhood Liaison to facilitate involvement and information sharing. Intentionality: I will support collaborative efforts to create a comprehensive growth plan to identify infill/redevelopment areas; provide protections to our neighborhoods and historic/cultural assets; enhance access to green space, parks and trails; increase our tree canopy; and, protect our streams and environment. As neighborhoods transform, we must ensure vulnerable residents and neighborhoods are protected from the negative impacts of gentrification. Context-sensitivity: I will work to create processes to ensure development/redevelopment is sensitive to the character and scale of existing neighborhoods. Incentivize and Streamline: I will prioritize modernizing and streamlining our ordinances and processes to make it easier for quality infill/redevelopment projects to be undertaken. I support funding the Public Infrastructure Program to help defray the costs associated with constructing public infrastructure like sidewalks and sewers. Housing: A recent study concluded that Lexington needs to increase the diversity of housing types to meet the evolving needs of our community. A diverse housing stock increases affordability and provides a variety of options to our citizens, including to our seniors, young professionals and low-income citizens. I support policies that will increase diversity, while protecting existing neighborhoods.
  • Ronnie Bastin- Lexington is a great place to live. I have worked here, raised a family here and I want to make sure we maintain that high quality of life for future generations. Our mix of untouched rolling bluegrass, horse farms, vibrant urban center and small town charm is what makes Lexington special. Each of these things is individually important to our cities character and must be valued and maintained. As we grow, we must do so in a way that prioritizes protecting our green space, and making the most of our already developed landscape.

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Urban County Council At-Large:
*Incumbent

  • Lillie E. Miller-Johnson- It would depend on the neighborhoods and what that neighborhood stands for or represent(s) or represented to the city of Lexington.
  • Steve Kay*- As Vice Mayor I recently created a special task force of the council, the Task Force on Neighborhoods in Transition, and appointed Councilmember James Brown as Chair. Here is the stated purpose of the task force: To identify ways to protect vulnerable residents from the consequences of neighborhood redevelopment and transformation, with an emphasis on preserving history and culture of communities. I serve as a member of the task force, and will work with Councilmember Brown and all the members of the task force to determine ways to ensure that development happens in an equitable manner in our community.
  • Connie Kell- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Richard Moloney*- There are zoning ordinances, overlays and land use restrictions that help protect existing neighborhoods, but infill and redevelopment will present challenges. NIMBY (not in my back yard) is a real problem and developers will have to creatively blend new projects into the character of the established neighborhoods.
  • Adrian Wallace- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Chuck Ellinger, II.- In order for Lexington to be a thriving city, we must grow, but in a responsible way. We must protect our neighborhoods. We need to be aware of what we are adding to them. We need an implementation strategy that encourages development and protects neighborhood character. We should provide incentives that creates the appropriate development and upgrades infrastructe. However, we must always be cognizant of gentrification.

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Urban County District Council:
*Incumbent

District 1-

  • Anita Rowe Franklin- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • James Brown*- I recommend that developers make contact with community members to learn about the character and history of the neighborhood. Use those opportunity to get a better understanding of the housing stock that may meet the needs of the community.

District 2-

  • Josh McCurn- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Joseph Smith*- I believe in providing well-designed neighborhoods and communities by enabling existing and new neighborhoods to flourish by improving regulations, expanding opportunities for neighborhood character preservation, and public commitment to expand options for mixed-use and mixed-type housing throughout Lexington-Fayette County. I will continue to strive for positive and safe social interactions in neighborhoods, including, but not limited to, neighborhoods that connect for pedestrians and various modes of transportation. By minimizing disruption of natural features when building new communities, along with promoting, maintaining and expanding the urban forest throughout Lexington, we can protect the character and context of existing neighborhoods.
    Successful Neighborhood growth relies on diversifying our housing stock to meet the needs of our community. I will continue to pursue incentives and regulatory approaches that encourage creativity and sustainability in housing development. By responsibly accommodating the demand for housing in Lexington, prioritizing higher density and mixture of housing types, I believe we will provide safe, affordable and accessible housing to meet the needs of our community residents, including our older and / or disadvantaged residents. Creating and implementing house incentives that strengthen the opportunities for higher density and housing affordability is essential.

District 3-

  • J. “Jake” Gibbs*- That’s a tough one. I am a strong proponent of infill. I support the Comprehensive Plan’s advocacy for density and variety in housing choices. However, we must be careful to protect existing older neighborhoods. It is a difficult balance to achieve. We must be especially careful to preserve our H-1 areas but expect a certain amount of “building-up” near them, if we are to hold the line on sprawl. More neighborhoods should consider ND-1 overlays to protect their integrity. Those overlays are less stringent than H-1 and are tailored by the neighborhood to fit their needs.
  • Renee Jackson Shepard- I believe neighborhood planning is a must for our community. Looking at individual neighborhoods from the aspects of land use, infrastructure, transportation, housing stock, environmental issues and community facilities is the best way to plan for what is needed and to protect the character and context of existing neighborhoods. Having specific neighborhood plans would also document opportunities to add units and diversify our housing stock. I recommend additional planning staff dedicated solely to this effort.

District 4-

  • Barry Saturday- The Comprehensive Plan of 2018 has many characteristics that are positive for preserving the character of existing neighborhoods, but I’m concerned about its implementation. The 4th District witnessed a zone change recently in an area that was predominantly open yards with single-family homes. This zone change on Tates Creek Rd saw a single-family home and a vacant lot in the Glendover area turned into a walled, 14 townhouse development that was opposed by nearly everyone, from the neighborhood association, to the individual residents, and even the church next door.
    Having canvassed the area to learn voters’ feelings, I’ve learned disapproval of this zone change is around 99%. Only two of the hundreds I spoke to favored it. Despite nearly unanimous opposition, the 4th District Councilmember not only voted for, but surprisingly made the motion to approve it. As a result, the council approved it, despite it not adhering to many aspects of the Comprehensive Plan. These issues were well documented by area residents and I at the June 12 hearing in Council chambers, including preserving the character of the neighborhood, the Comprehensive Plan’s interest in public input, preserving greenspace and tree canopy, as well as the development creating greater stormwater issues, among many other concerns.
    The 4th District was poorly represented in this matter, and the residents of Glendover and other 4th District neighborhoods deserve a Councilmember that will listen to their concerns and vote to protect the character and context of 4th District neighborhoods.
  • Susan Lamb*- I concur with our 2018 Comprehensive Plan Goals and Objectives. We need to encourage creativity and sustainability in housing development and prioritize higher-density and mixture of housing types. We also need to plan for safe, affordable and accessible housing to meet the needs of older and/or disadvantaged residents. Plus we need to create and implement housing incentives that strengthen the opportunities for higher-density and housing affordability.

District 5-

  • Liz Sheehan- Thoughtful development must include protecting and enhancing the character of our existing neighborhoods. The first step would be to talk with the residents in the area about the characteristics of their neighborhood and their needs. Part of the discussion with these neighborhoods must be how we can realistically balance preserving the Urban Services Boundary and also deal with our housing shortage. There will be some discomfort with in-fill development, but as a community we have placed value on protecting our farmlands outside of the Boundary. Balance will be key. The second step would be to consider the existing architecture and appearance of the area, in addition to any current spaces that could be repurposed for the evolving needs of the community. Mixed use spaces that accompany housing should be considered, like small grocery stores on the first floor of a housing development for areas within food desert regions.
  • Bill Farmer, Jr.*- To me that is the upcoming work product of the Neighborhoods in Transition Taskforce that I am a part of. I will support a balanced approach in each neighborhood.

District 6-

  • Gabriel Williams- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Angela Evans*- While development plans and asthetics are still fully within the developer’s rights, depending on the neighborhood, I might suggest designing similar TO the closest or oldest neighborhood as opposed simply designing the most modern or latest style residence. Conforming to the overall style of the neighborhood MIGHT be more palitable and appropriate for some neighborhoods.

District 7-

  • Preston Worley*- Infill and density can cause collateral damage if we are not very deliberate in how we develop inside the boundary. We have to first take a hard look at where we have the infrastructure to develop and how we can improve that infrastructure where lacking. Particularly, we have to continue working to improve our sewer capacity to accommodate more development. Additionally, we have to remember our neighborhoods in transition—those that are being redeveloped and those that see development encroaching on them. As Councilmember, I have deliberately analyzed each and every zone change that has come before the Council, consulting with both developers and neighbors to reach a compromise that meets the city’s housing needs while preserving the character of surrounding neighborhoods. I believe that every time we consider changing our land uses we must judge the merits of each proposal, individually looking to protect the interests of the neighborhoods most closely impacted. We should encourage developers and city planners to work with those neighborhoods to make new infill development complement the surrounding area.
  • Chris Logan- Many decisions are made with little concern or input from our neighborhoods. Often, they are the ones that are impacted most. Any future planning must take into consideration the impact on neighborhoods and work at preserving their unique character.

District 8-

  • Christian J. Motley- I believe that for Lexington to be the best place to live, work, and raise a family we need new leadership that will see our people as our greatest strength. I want to work with stakeholders to develop strategies that invest in children, grow economic opportunity, and build safe and healthy neighborhoods across our entire community. Lexington has seen tremendous growth in recent years, but I do not believe that our community can be all that it should if that success does not reach down and across every neighborhood in our city. I believe local leaders must advance a smart growth strategy that does not displace or leave our people behind. Let’s grow in way that is informed by greater input from and collaboration with our neighbors. Let’s incentivize inclusion and dynamic design, promote green space, walkability and connectivity – ensuring that everyone from retirees to young children have safe routes to schools, libraries, and parks.
  • Fred V. Brown*- Did not complete questionnaire.

District 9-

  • Jacob Glancy- We truly have a defined issue with affordable housing, especially in south Lexington. I am of the belief that every one of our citizens should be well equipped to live in our county. This can be done by getting government and abusive regulation off the backs of the housing sector. Our diversity is one of the most beautiful pieces of our society. I believe our policies will create a better way of life for us all.
  • Jennifer Mossotti*- Lexington is a city of unique neighborhoods and it is essential that we protect the character of each individual neighborhood so that they each continue to flourish. We must strive to provide a diverse mix of housing choices for all stages of life and income ranges. Walkable, mixed use developments that enhances our community are essential. I support efforts to maintain a vision to create a wide variety of housing options in Lexington that ultimately supports neighborhood vitality. The City’s Planning Commission and Urban County Council must continue to focus on policies, practices, and regulatory instruments to facilitate the protection and preservation of our existing neighborhoods. We can achieve such goals by implementing and maintaining programs and grants designed to support our neighborhoods. In the City’s most recent budget, the Neighborhood Action Match Grant Program went unfunded. Since 1985, the program had supported neighborhood associations in carrying out development activities and improvements. Upon learning of the funding cut, I advocated for funds to be made available to continue this important program and I am pleased to report that the administration was ultimately able to fund the program for another year. Neighborhood associations in Lexington are now able to once again apply for up to $10,000 for special projects that enhance our city.

District 10-

  • Amanda Mays Bledsoe*- Running Unopposed

District 11-

  • Sandy Shafer- The LFUCG could establish a “Neighborhood Division” inside government with a board made up of community-wide and neighborhood leaders that could bring oversight to the overall strategy for types of development, infill, and businesses coupled with appropriate housing stock. Neighborhoods could benefit from having their own small area plans, design guidelines and better oversight in order to protect the character and diversity within their individual areas on a proactive basis. Neighborhoods should be on the front end of all discussions and not too far into the process. Neighborhoods that are in decline seem to have the least protection and expertise available to them and could use this division to help in distressed areas. All development should be neighborhood friendly and preserve the character of the existing neighborhood. Compromise should be a key with the ultimate goal being the best use for the area. Everyone lives in a neighborhood.
  • Jennifer Reynolds- The 11th district, like many other places in our city, is full of a diverse housing stock. We have many homes:, some newer homes, many older homes of different sizes, duplexes, and apartment buildings. Residents love their neighborhoods and are proud of where they live. Many people moved into certain areas for the aesthetics, the feel, and diversity. As housing stock ages, it’s important that we empower the current residents of our unique neighborhoods to assist in the planning of infill. While talking with neighbors in my district many are concerned about the effect infill is having and may have on their communities. They are concerned about houses that do not fit the character and appearance of their neighborhoods, houses and buildings that are too tall, too large, or use materials that do not maintain the neighborhood’s architectural integrity. One neighborhood association is looking into adding an ND-1 overlay to their neighborhood and others have already done this. I believe empowering our neighborhoods to lead the way in setting standards and regulations for new buildings is a positive step to ensuring that the attractiveness and appeal of our communities is not compromised by infill projects. Property owners can responsibly construct new buildings without negatively impacting the character of existing neighborhoods.

District 12-

  • Monteia Mundy Owenby- Many of Lexington’s neighborhoods are going through changes and revitalization. We must use caution to ensure that the unique character of these existing neighborhoods is preserved as they tend to become diversified through the changes. The LFUCG Planning & Zoning Commission study that has been proposed should give us great insight into the direction of our community’s future housing needs.
  • Kathy Plomin*- The character and context of our existing neighborhoods is a very important component of our city’s identity. Many of these older neighborhoods especially in our downtown have a history that should be respected and elevated. We must have communication and input from these neighborhoods so that their identity is maintained and that improvements are reflective of their neighborhoods culture. As our 2018 housing study told us demographics are changing. Our demographic profile will be looking like an hourglass. The top of the hourglass reflects that our aging boomers are now beginning to downsize and looking for smaller spaces to live that are close to lifestyle amenities. The under 35 demographics will also be looking at smaller spaces conveniently located for close access to their interest. So, the housing landscape will be changing to apartments, condominiums and town homes rather than large single suburb dwellings.

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3. What specific recommendations do you have to address Lexington’s affordable housing issue?

Urban County Mayor:

  • Linda Gorton- A recent housing study made clear that our most pressing housing needs are for low-income citizens, seniors and young professionals. I will create a comprehensive housing policy to meet the diverse housing needs of all our citizens. Diversity: The housing study emphasized the need to increase the diversity of housing types. Healthy communities have a range of housing options—single family, condos, duplexes, apartments, etc. Housing diversity increases affordability and provides options for people across the life span and income levels. I support policies to increase housing diversity, while also protecting the character and context of existing neighborhoods. Accessibility: Our demographics make clear that we must create new housing inside the city limits. A growing senior population, young professionals and low-income citizens need accessible and affordable housing that is connected to amenities, necessities and transportation. Affordable Housing: Communities around the nation are struggling to meet the demand for affordable housing. Lexington is making strides through the Affordable Housing Trust Fund, but we must accelerate the construction of affordable homes, particularly with an aging population. I am committed to exploring options to increase the pace of construction as well as the annual allocation to the Fund. Gentrification: As neighborhoods transform and redevelop, we must ensure vulnerable residents and neighborhoods are protected from the negative impacts of gentrification. I will develop policies to address this issue, including policies to help people stay in their homes.
  • Ronnie Bastin- As mayor I will continue to provide financing for the affordable housing fund. In addition, I will work with builders, developers and landlords to find ways to incentivize building more affordable housing in Lexington.

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Urban County Council At-Large:
*Incumbent

  • Lillie E. Miller-Johnson- There are a lot of different affordable housing issue’s that have come up over the years and the present one’s will have to be looked at individually…I have fought for housing issue’s and we got Habitat for Humanity, Reach, and Housing authority used one of my ideas with homes for sale for working class individuals-those with low income..so I am confident that there are other ways to fight this battle which I already have in mind.
  • Steve Kay*- As Chair of the Mayor’s Commission on Homelessness I was a major advocate for the proposal approved by Council appropriating $2M per year for an Affordable Housing Fund. I presently serve on the Affordable Housing Fund Board. With $11M allocated in the last four years, the Board has provided crucial support for projects totaling just over $100 that have preserved or created over 1300 units of affordable housing. I have advocated for an increased allocation, and for creative ways to use the income being generated by low-interest loans to some of these projects as leverage for support for additional projects.
  • Connie Kell- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Richard Moloney*- I support the Affordable Housing Program and the annual budget allocation to the Affordable Housing Fund. This program has been effective at leveraging public and private investment to develop housing options for individuals and families at or below 80% of the area median income. There are several other agencies, such as REACH and the Lexington Housing Authority, that are also working hard to provide affordable housing options in our community.
  • Adrian Wallace- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Chuck Ellinger, II.- Affordable housing must be an important issue for the Mayor and Council. Thanks to the efforts of BUILD, the Council created the Office of Affordable Housing and we initially funded it three million from FY 2014 budget. Moreover, annual allocations were adopted by ordinance for two million. The fund has been very successful in leveraging public investment to create affordable housing. We must continue to add affordable housing for all segments of our community.

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Urban County District Council:
*Incumbent

District 1-

  • Anita Rowe Franklin- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • James Brown*- I recommend that the city identify a dedicated funding source for the affordable housing fund in addition to gradually make increases to the fund in order to reach recommended funded levels. Another recommendation would be to intentionally disperse affordable housing options through out our community in attempts to prevent over saturation in areas.

District 2-

  • Josh McCurn- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Joseph Smith*- Housing plays a very important role in all our lives. The ability to choose where you live determines your access to other resources and services. It determines where your children go to school. it can affect your job and the type of healthcare you receive; and even the type of recreational activities in which you and your family participate.
    I believe Lexington’s affordable housing must continue as a “top burner issue” for discussion. We must work to achieve an optimum level of communication between developers, LFUCG Planning Commission and staff, and citizens, including identifying ways to improve the goals and objectives.
    We measure the effectiveness of our Comprehensive Plan by identifying indicators of success or failure and ways to increase accountability. However, the total increment of housing stock needed must meet the increase in housing demand.
    Well-designed neighborhoods and communities enable existing and new neighborhoods to flourish through (1) improved regulation, (2) expanding opportunities for neighborhood character preservation and public commitment to options for mixed-use and mixed-type housing, and (3) provide educational resources and home-buyer lending opportunities.

District 3-

  • J. “Jake” Gibbs*- While we’ve made great strides in creating affordable housing since the inception of the Affordable Housing Fund in 2014 (over 1,200 units), the $2 million a year that goes into it is not enough to keep pace with our affordable housing needs. I support increasing the fund significantly.
    I am on the Board of Directors of the Lexington Community Land Trust. That nonprofit has built many affordable homes in the Davis View neighborhood along the Newtown Pike Extension (Oliver Lewis Way). Private support of the Community Land Trust would help it expand its excellent work into other areas of the city.
  • Renee Jackson Shepard- We need to first understand what the current price points are for different housing types. Once this information is gathered we can work on addressing the areas of greatest need. I am in favor of offering incentives to developers in exchange for them creating affordable housing units. I believe that this approach would enable us to invest more and more effectively in the Affordable Housing Trust Fund.

District 4-

  • Barry Saturday- Prioritizing infill is unfortunately causing an affordable housing crisis. Limiting supply inevitably causes higher demand, leading to higher land values. Expanding the Urban Services Boundary (USB) by itself will create more supply, naturally lowering housing price rises throughout the city, and slowing the growth of affordable housing problems city-wide.
    To allow infill development to occur without damaging the ability of lower-income residents to live in our community, we should grow the USB with great care and thoughtfulness as to how we can preserve and highlight the unique character of our farming heritage, while also increasing affordable housing, improving our town’s ability to attract business and jobs, and better connecting our schools with the neighborhoods they serve.
    Fayette County Public Schools (FCPS) already has great experience and talent in connecting student academic content with agri-business. We can leverage this in innovative ways. My idea of expansion would include working with FCPS to promote the development of new neighborhoods of varying character and price levels alongside farms and schools. This would permit more hands-on coursework designed to incorporate academic objectives with increased student knowledge of, interest in, and passion for agri-business. Nearby commercial developments could include Kentucky Proud (or even “Lexington Proud”) student-produced agri-business products on the grocery shelves of markets, promoting greater, and lasting pride in our local farms and agribusiness.
  • Susan Lamb*- Lexington’s Affordable Housing Program was created in 2014 to help create affordable housing for households at or below 80 percent of area median income ($54,550 for a family of four). The program consists of three parts: the Affordable Housing Fund, the Affordable Housing Governing Board and the Office of Affordable Housing. The mission of the Affordable Housing Fund is to leverage public investment to preserve, produce, and provide safe, quality, affordable housing. The Affordable Housing Fund was created with an initial allocation of $3 million from Lexington’s FY 2014 general fund budget. Annual allocations of at least $2 million were adopted by Ordinance 103-2014.
    I fully support to continue annual allocations for Lexington’s Affordable Housing Program.

District 5-

  • Liz Sheehan- Affordable housing needs to be tackled from multiple angles. We must fully fund the Affordable Housing Trust Fund and prioritize long-term affordable housing developments. I recently visited the Davis Park neighborhood developed by the Lexington Community Land Trust (CLT). Their goal is to increase permanently affordable housing that is high quality and energy efficient. We should support programs like this; but also, like the CLT, we should model after effective case studies from other cities. Other potential solutions could include exploring mixed-rate housing developments, a tax freeze for long-term homeowners in gentrifying neighborhoods, or incentivizing more Section 8 housing. With seniors comprising almost a third of our population, they need to be considered in discussions of affordable and alternative housing options.
  • Bill Farmer, Jr.*- Continued funding for both Affordable Housing and Homelessness is essential. Studying those populations will provide further insight and actions.

District 6-

  • Gabriel Williams- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Angela Evans*- I encourage developers to take advantage of tax credits available that will benefit them in the building process and a percentage of tenants who will reside there. There are a limited amount of developers in Lexington engaged in affordable housing and we need more. Understanding affordable housing development isn’t an area for everyone, a focused recruitment effort might be required, (in state or out) to find developers willing to do work here. The Office of Affordable Housing has worked with various developers in the city and has done great work utilizing funds to renovate and expand properties in Lexington but more needs to be done, and we ned more participation.

District 7-

  • Preston Worley*- Affordable housing is a passion of mine. My private law practice focuses on the financing and development of affordable housing and as Councilmember I have championed and supported the funding of offices and programs to address homelessness prevention, affordable housing development, and neighborhoods in transition.
    I will continue to support and fight for expansion of the LFUCG Affordable Housing Trust Fund, a $2 million dollar annual fund that has been leveraged to assist in approximately $100 million dollars in affordable housing development over its short existence. Through that fund, Lexington, along with private developers and state agencies, has participated in the construction and/or rehabilitation of hundreds of housing units for low to moderate income families. I have proposed a larger investment in the Affordable Housing Trust Fund and will continue to fight for it. Additionally, I will propose the full staffing of an Office of Affordable Housing to allow for the expansion of investment and support for affordable development in our city.
  • Chris Logan- We must make sure that affordable housing is available to everyone. Our growth needs to be balanced with options that achieve this goal. One way to accomplish this is for Lexington to provide incentives for development projects designed to create affordable housing to our elderly and disadvantaged residents.

District 8-

  • Christian J. Motley- In a recent report from the Lexington Fair Housing Council Report, Locked Out, they raised housing instability as a key issue. They named that as many as 19% of renters could be evicted in an average year, and those who experience eviction of 11-22% more likely to also experience job loss. This is an economic issue, and some of the highest eviction areas include pockets in my district. For affordable housing, many solutions center on home ownership. I want to ensure that we do not forget those who rent as well. I believe our work is to build ladders of opportunity for families working to make ends meet, and I support the creation of the Taskforce on Neighborhoods in Transition to review strategies to support low income residents vulnerable to increases in rent costs.
  • Fred V. Brown*- Did not complete questionnaire.

District 9-

  • Jacob Glancy- As I stated earlier, abusive government regulation hurts diversity and the ability of all people to live where they wish. I will address affordable housing by advocating for a vibrant economy to increase home purchasing power and rental availability to all.
  • Jennifer Mossotti*- Lexington’s Urban County Council has demonstrated a strong commitment towards addressing the availability of affordable housing where the need exists. With the creation of the City’s Office of Affordable Housing, we as a city took a huge step towards ensuring those who could benefit from affordable housing will be aware of how to take advantage of available resources. I remain fully supportive of the office and its efforts in addressing the issue.

District 10-

  • Amanda Mays Bledsoe*- Running Unopposed

District 11-

  • Sandy Shafer- Affordable housing is an extremely complex issue based on a number of factors and should not be aimed solely at lower-income households. It should include senior citizens, handicapped and first-time owners. I would like to see the addition of “Accessory Dwelling Units” (ADUs) carefully considered and added to planning and zoning. There has been a lot of chatter about “granny flats” and I believe that raising density and mixed-use in some specific areas and some specific zones inside the USB should be considered. This additional housing stock could be small and affordable and would be available to services already in place like bus routes, public services, parks, churches, groceries, schools and universities.
  • Jennifer Reynolds- Similar to the previous question, the affordable housing issue needs more engagement. Within the 11th District, there are many areas where new housing is being developed and the perception, and sometimes the reality, is that the fee for rent or ownership out-prices many who have lived in the area before redevelopment. My recommendations to address this involve looking at the facts around what price point is needed to respond to the demand and working with my colleagues and government staff to develop and support incentives that allow affordability in building and consequently in rent. We have some examples in Lexington, and even within my district where this is working effectively like AU Associates ‘s Parkside Apartments off of Cross Keys. I want to work to increase similar developments while allowing flexibility for those who are working to respond appropriately to our housing needs.

District 12-

  • Monteia Mundy Owenby- Affordable housing in Lexington is not an easy issue. As infill continues, land costs will rise. Along with the additional school taxes and property taxes that will be applied as progress continues inside the boundary, the dream of home ownership becomes more elusive. I would like to see there be some state and local subsidies for assisting current residents, as well as new residents, in being able to afford to live in Lexington. I am especially interested in creating programs to assist first time homebuyers. Another component is providing incentives for employees who work in Lexington to also live in Lexington.
  • Kathy Plomin*- Affordable Housing is a concern for our community. The Affordable Housing Trust that was put in place several years ago has made a difference with its infusion of 2miiiion dollars a year. However, the challenge still remains. One factor is the increasing rental rates that are due to supply and demand. There was an incentive offered to developers to build affordable housing that was not accessed. From my United Way days as president, I witnessed the impact of affordable housing has on a family. If 70% of household income is being spent on housing, most other needs cannot be met. We need to work with developers to look at another more attractive partnership as well as look for other funding pockets from a state, national or private funding level

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4. The number of households headed by someone aged 65 or older is projected to increase significantly over the next decade and beyond. What specific recommendations do you have to meet the needs of our growing senior population?

Urban County Mayor:

  • Linda Gorton- Addressing the needs of our aging population will be a primary focus of my administration. I will ensure our community grows in a way that is inclusive and livable for our citizens throughout their life span. Housing: Over half of the demand for new housing over the next decade will be for people 65 and older. A wider array of housing types can offer safer, more affordable, lower-maintenance homes within existing communities so our seniors maintain independence and remain engaged in the community. Aging-in-Place: Aging-in-Place increases the need for in-home support, services and care. I will work with the Senior Services Commission to create the strategies and support systems to help seniors maintain independence. I will also explore creating Senior Center satellite or outreach facilities to help seniors access information and the many great services and programs offered at the Center. Transportation: Transportation options help seniors remain independent, mobile and engaged in the community. I will prioritize creating safe and accessible multi-modal transportation infrastructure, such as bicycle lanes, trails, pedestrian walkways and crosswalks and public transit stops. I will work with LexTran, the Senior Services Commission and other stakeholders to address the unique transportation needs of seniors at all income levels. Work and community engagement: Our seniors have a wealth of knowledge, expertise and skill to share. I will work with businesses and community organizations to create pathways for seniors to obtain employment or volunteer opportunities.
  • Ronnie Bastin- As Mayor, I will continue support the work of the Office of Aging and Disability Services. Lexington has a strong record of providing care, recreation and educational opportunities for our seniors. I will continue that work. The Lexington Senior Center, The I-Know Expo and The Senior Intern program are just some of the examples of the great ways our city invests in our senior citizens. As mayor, I would like to see these services expanded, or have any costs associated with participating in these programs lowered—so as to make them more accessible to more people in the community.

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Urban County Council At-Large:
*Incumbent

  • Lillie E. Miller-Johnson- I would suggest that we put together a forum or study, asking the elderly what they would prefer or suggestions they have in mind. I myself am getting to that age, so we will see as things progress…if I answer with my solutions, then where or what would you need me for?
  • Steve Kay*- The city took a major step forward with the creation of a new Senior Center that has proven to be heavily used and widely praised, so much so that many of its programs are at or over capacity. While there are many worthwhile projects competing for capital funds, I will advocate for beginning the process of determining whether additional facilities are needed, and how they might be funded, as well as how existing park and community center resources can be made more available for seniors. We should also look at additional ways to partner with FCPS, the Y, and other organizations that provide services for seniors. Longer term, we need to be investigating existing options and new ideas about “aging in place,” so that seniors have the highest possible quality of life as they age.
  • Connie Kell- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Richard Moloney*- I voted to adopt the Goals and Objectives of the Comprehensive Plan, which has specific recommendations for neighborhood design that will help the quality of life for our aging population. I do see the need for additional senior and assisted living facilities and there are several new developments of this type underway.
  • Adrian Wallace- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Chuck Ellinger, II.- We are an aging population. My parents are both in their 80’s and I am witnessing this first hand. My father has Parkinson’s and his health is declining. My mom has been his sole care provider, but it is becoming to big of task for her. We must provide the services so they can age gracefully and in a dignified way. We can look at zone changes that allow adapting ones house and property for aging parents and relatives. Lexington has been recognized as a community to retire in. We should continue to provide more senior living residences with a focus on affordablity. Along with that, we need to make sure their basic needs ie. grocery store, pharmacy, retail, transportation, hospitals and health care, etc. are met.

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Urban County District Council:
*Incumbent
District 1-

  • Anita Rowe Franklin- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • James Brown*- Our city needs to explore zoning options that allow for auxiliary elder/senior dwelling flexibility in our current neighborhoods. Create incentives for developers to build or re-purpose smaller, accessible and affordable units to accommodate our growing senior population.

District 2-

  • Josh McCurn- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Joseph Smith*- Seniors prefer remaining in their communities rather than move to a new community more physically suited to their needs. The vast majority of older adults prefer to stay right where they are. However, changing healthcare needs, loss of mobility, financial concerns, home maintenance and increasing property taxes present significant impediments to this simple and primary desire. The demands to support seniors in the community can provide opportunities to advance quality growth objectives. Structuring community design, housing and healthcare to meet needs of seniors creates multiple social and economic benefits for the entire community. Pedestrian accessibility, efficient public transportation, housing type diversity, commercial/residential integration are all quality growth goals and aging in place necessities
    Affordable options along the income spectrum should be available so all citizens and caregivers are able to choose from a range of alternatives. Flexibility requires that levels of health and housing supports be adjustable whether an individual lives in a single family home, rents a privately or publicly managed apartment or resides in an assisted living facility. The senior population presents not only challenges but opportunities. My experiences as a CouncilMember serving on the Senior Service Commission, present me with opportunities to explore new affordable services. Maintaining mixed-generation communities can maximize older adults’ capacity for self-help and community contribution. There are valuable links between the needs and skills of different age groups. By designing communities that are more accessible and livable, our senior population benefits by remaining in their homes and community.

District 3-

  • J. “Jake” Gibbs*- I head one of those households. I am a 65-year-old retired professor.
    LFUCG’s recently completed senior center is an excellent facility and has enhanced life for many people. So, we are making strides. However, there is still much room for improvement. We need to make the city more walkable so older people can rely less on cars. We need to improve our bus system.
    There is a dearth of homes that occupy a single floor. We should encourage the building of condos and rental units on one floor in areas of the city walkable for shopping. A preponderance of these should be affordable to retired middle class folks.
    We should also explore allowing Accessory Dwelling Units. These can be a boon to those who would like to age in place. However, any ordinance allowing them must be very carefully crafted to prevent abuses.
  • Renee Jackson Shepard- I am the primary care giver for my 84 year old mom and understand the importance of this topic. Creating “livable communities” should be a priority for our community. Utilizing “universal design” in all public facilities should be required. By utilizing these two concepts we become a much more inclusive community for all ages. We need to offer a package of transportation options for our seniors. Improvements to our public transportation system is one way to give our seniors access to the services they need without requiring them to drive themselves. The current hub & spoke system is a deterrent to many people because of the time commitment. The lack of bus shelters and benches at many stops also deters ridership. Wheels and ITN Bluegrass offer more of a door-to-door option for seniors that is appealing especially if the client has memory or physically issues that might require added help that LexTran cannot provide. There is a discussion underway about Lexington becoming a “Dementia Friendly Community”. I support this effort and think it is critical to our future. We need to create a community that is educated, respectful and safe for individuals dealing with dementia and for their caregivers. A variety of housing types is needed in order to accommodate seniors. Not all seniors want to live alone. UK is conducting a study to see what types of housing are appealing to seniors. Alternative types of housing such as shared or cooperative housing might be utilized more in the future.

District 4-

  • Barry Saturday- Once again, growing our boundary wisely will be an effective way to increase Lexington’s capacity of senior-oriented residences. The multi-use new CenterPoint/CityCenter tower is a great example of what we can incorporate into future planning. Multi-use development encourages building up as well, to minimize the land use footprint. New developments can include elevator-accessible dwelling spaces designed for those who would like to live in walking distance from a grocery store, a church, and a farm, all at the same time. Think of the 4th District’s The Summit at Fritz Farm, but bigger, more dynamic, and bolder, and you keep the farm and utilize it as a living part of the development.
    These 21st century neighborhoods could also include safe paths for walking or riding bikes on trails alongside the aforementioned farm’s acreage with visible livestock. Imagine parents dropping kids off at the grandparents’ living community, and the grandparents taking the young children for a walk, and the kids are shouting “horsey, grandpa, horsey!”
    As it is nearly impossible (prohibitively expensive) to create such designs inside the existing boundary, and 70% of Fayette County’s land area is outside the boundary, expansion of the boundary will be necessary to create these uniquely designed liveable greenspaces. Having the Boundary allows the city to require certain design elements be incorporated into any development plans. We should use that power to full effect in preserving our farming heritage while designing the Lexington of the future.
  • Susan Lamb*- We have to look at the types of housing our senior population needs whether it is home ownership or rental. We are looking into accessory dwelling units which are separate structures that can be built by an immediate family member who needs to provide a safe living environment for their aging family member. The 4th District has a large population of homeowners aged 65 or older and, since I have been on Council, I have known several who had to move to assisted living facilities. I would like to see our neighborhoods continue to grow with a more diversified population so there are opportunities to learn from each other as well as looking out for one another.

District 5-

  • Liz Sheehan- Lexington-Fayette should be a livable community in every stage of life. At the “Meeting the Challenges and Opportunities of Aging” Conference in May, I learned about issues seniors are facing. We need housing options for seniors whether they want to age in place, live in an independent living facility, or live in an assisted living facility. These options need to be available and affordable for those on a fixed income. I’m following the conversation around Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs) and hopeful about the ordinance being drafted. In addition to housing, public transportation should be a priority for seniors who no longer drive. The social and mental wellbeing of seniors must be examined. In June, I attended a meeting regarding ADUs at the Lexington Senior Center and was struck by a presenter’s comment: loneliness is an epidemic. Loneliness is an overlooked aspect of aging, despite the serious health implications (e.g. depression, onset of dementia or Alzheimer’s, cardiovascular disease, and anxiety). The United Kingdom has gone as far as appointing a Minister of Loneliness to address feelings of social isolation within their aging community. It’s not uncommon for the elderly in the UK to go up to a week without meaningful human contact. Having places, like our senior centers, to foster a sense of connection and create community is one vital step towards eradicating social isolation. We should keep the wellbeing and sense of belonging of our elderly population in the forefront of our minds.
  • Bill Farmer, Jr.*- Making more housing choices available for aging populations needs to be a focus & again every neighborhood needs to be a part of the answer.

District 6-

  • Gabriel Williams- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Angela Evans*- I presume the question is referring to meeting housing needs of the growing senior population. More senior independent and assisted living facilities will be needed in Lexington and across the country. The 6th district has at least 3 different examples of senior living facilities currently in it within 3 miles of each other. I believe the need for more appropriate housing for a growing senior population is a reason to consider expanding the urban service boundary, as it naturally takes more space (one level, wider halls, etc) for a senior conscious residence, whether single residence or multiple. Additionally, the city will need to exam if and how the Senior Citizens Center’s role will or should change with a growing population. Will it need more staff to provide more direct services? Stay mainly as a community center? I encourage the Senior Services Commission to submit ideas to the administration and Council with plans/ideas for services based on research that the city could implement over the next 10 years to best assist the grown senior population.

District 7-

  • Preston Worley*- As Councilmember, I have supported funding for aging services and I am committed to continuing to do so. In recent years Lexington has invested in a new fully staffed, fully programmed Senior Center and senior programs throughout other community centers in the City. We need to expand these services and promote them so that our aging neighbors, and their families, know what services are available to them. Additionally, we need to look at ways to educate citizens about where to find funding and assistance to obtain aging in place measures such as accessibility improvements to their homes, access to home healthcare, meal assistance, and transportation. It is important to most seniors to be able to stay in their homes and live as independently as possible. As a City, we need to do all we can to help.
  • Chris Logan- We need to make sure our comprehensive plan recognizes this growing population. We must increase services that help provide mobility and independence for seniors. We also need to focus on strategies that will allow seniors to stay in their homes longer. Lexington needs more options for senior living, options that might be explored through P3 alternatives. We should also look at ways to amend zoning regulations that would allow more options to families with seniors, like auxiliary housing units.

District 8-

  • Christian J. Motley- Growing up, I only knew my grandmother in her senior years. To this day, I remember her as one of the most vibrant woman that I have ever knows. She was a pillar of the community who local leaders called on. The single park in the community where I grew up, was initiated by petition with signatures that she collected door to door. She was a leader in her church who fostered youth in a home that was the heartbeat of the neighborhood. Her life is a constant reminder to me of the essentiality of our whole community, and how seniors in our community play many roles to help our neighborhoods thrive. It’s true that Lexington’s aging population is growing. Some estimates say that the over 65 population will reach 71 million by 2030 – that’s double the number from 2006. I believe that Lexington should be a community where seniors may comfortably age in place – where they have retirement security, housing stability, and have access recreational options that encourage healthy living. For our seniors, a well-designed community that is livable and accessible is more than an amenity – it’s a necessity. Local government should prioritize high quality transportation options and pedestrian friendly infrastructure, promote local aging networks and mixed-generation opportunities, police predatory lenders, and leaders must understand that housing affordability is essential to aging in place, particularly for low-income residents.
  • Fred V. Brown*- Did not complete questionnaire.

District 9-

  • Jacob Glancy- Many of the folks in my district are on fixed income. Medicare and Medicaid recipients are among them. People like this cannot afford the high property taxes and general costs of living imposed by past leadership. I will fight for more reasonable programs to respect the current financial situation of our aging population.
  • Jennifer Mossotti*- Housing that an aging population can afford is crucial and the need to construct and rehabilitate affordable housing is a top priority. Recently, $300,000 from Lexington’s Affordable Housing Fund was used to leverage the renovation of the Ballard Apartments. The opportunity for government, and the private sector exists to create quality, low-cost housing and should be utilized. Another proposal is to encourage universal design for aging in place, making it easier for residents to stay in their homes when their needs and abilities change. Lexington’s new Senior Center is a state-of-the-art facility that is home to a variety of activities and services and programs for all Fayette County citizens ages 60 or older. Lexington continues to invest in senior-related activities and services and is very forward-thinking when it comes to the needs of our aging population. Our senior centers offer a safe and affordable place to spend time engaged in meaningful activities. They are staffed by dedicated professionals who have experience working with the senior population. In addition, Lexington has a Senior Services Commission and several conferences such as the ‘I Know Expo’ that cater to educating seniors and caregivers on available programs and advocating for the needs of our aging population. I am committed to supporting these programs to meet the needs of our growing senior population.

District 10-

  • Amanda Mays Bledsoe*- Running Unopposed

District 11-

  • Sandy Shafer- Housing for older adults needs to be considered county-wide. This could include the additional zoning for ADUs, HUD-sponsored low income housing, senior apartments, mixed-use, and senior-living communities with nearby nursing home facilities. All are important in planning for the elderly to be near physicians, libraries, stores, groceries and social services. This could provide the opportunity to age in place, near family (or care givers) while being in the area where they want to live or have always lived. Multi-use paths could be added to allow for connectivity, exercise and socializing. This could also meet the needs for those retirees living on a fixed income.
  • Jennifer Reynolds- Within my own district, the communities of Christian Towers and Lafayette Place remind me daily how important it is to support and enhance the quality of life of our senior residents. As we develop and re-develop our city, we must prioritize the needs of our senior community while also responding to the needs of all of our residents. Gil Penalosa, with 8-80 Cities, has visited Lexington and given his own assessment of how to implement affordable neighborhood interventions which could help to improve the quality of life for all residents from 8 to 80 years old. I support the types of interventions he presents about; whether it is accessible housing, wider sidewalks, or more public spaces for outdoor gathering with others. Including these types of low-cost interventions in development or redevelopment could help insure our senior communities are allowed the best quality of life Lexington has to offer.

District 12-

  • Monteia Mundy Owenby- Access to transportation is key. Many senior citizens are unable to continue driving and public transportation is not always available or convenient. Additionally, continuing to maintain state of the art medical facilities in Lexington. Gentrification needs to be observed carefully to assure security, both financially and socially, for our aging population.
  • Kathy Plomin*- As our population ages we will need to be proactive in providing housing to accommodate this population. Housing needs will vary as just as the individuals’ health needs will vary. Some of our aging citizens will enjoy a very active latter part of their life. Many will be downsizing so condo and apartments will need to be available. These dwellings should also be near lifestyle amenities desired by this sector. Other seniors that have health challenges and need assisted living facilities. It seems that our developers are looking ahead as there have been numerous new facilities that have been recently built or on the horizon. One benefit of this need for more condos, apartments and health related facilities is that it decreases the pressure on large parcels of land due to the smaller footprint to accommodate more density

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5. Do you support an annual funding allocation for Lexington’s Purchase of Development Rights Program (PDR)? Please list your specific ideas to support the continued strength and growth of our agricultural and tourism industries.

Urban County Mayor:

  • Linda Gorton- Yes, I support an annual funding allocation to the Purchase of Development Rights Program. I supported creation of the PDR program in 2000 and funding every year I was on council. Our Bluegrass Landscape and farms are central to our economic health and quality of life. I am committed to achieving the goals of the PDR program. Agriculture is economic development: Fayette County agriculture is an annual $2.3 billion industry that supports 1 in 12 jobs. We must leverage our signature agriculture industries and prime soils to become the global hub of high-tech ag innovation. I will work with state, regional and local partners to create the necessary environment to grow these industries and ensure continued growth of our entire agricultural economy. Travel and tourism: Lexington’s travel and tourism industry is exploding. Our farms, landscape and natural areas set us apart from other communities. We have something so special here, and I will work with VisitLex and other local, regional and state-wide stakeholders to showcase Lexington as a true travel destination. Local food, bourbon and breweries: Our farms support a growing local food, bourbon and craft brewery movement. These local businesses help create a dynamic city for visitors and locals alike while showing agriculture. We must create the necessary infrastructure to support these growing businesses.
  • Ronnie Bastin- I do support the PDR program. I believe continuing funding for this program will allow us to show our commitment to horse farms, as we look carefully and strategically at infill and growth of our city.

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Urban County Council At-Large:
*Incumbent

  • Lillie E. Miller-Johnson- I am a firm supporter of our agricultural and tourism industries, that is why we should preserve as much of our culture and context as possible. Again I would prefer not to answer with my ideas, as you know I worked for the Commonwealth of Kentucky and when asked for my ideas, it was used but I was not given credit; while working as a Substitute teacher I put in an idea, but was not paid for it, but five years later two other women were paid for the same idea I put in five years earlier. I have also emailed and left messages for ideas that would benefit Lexington, which were also sent to the Senate and Representatives, So until the idea(s) is needed……
  • Steve Kay*- I have been and will continue to be a strong advocate and supporter of the PDR Program, including an annual funding allocation. I also was instrumental in creation of Bluegrass Farm to Table, with staff in the city’s Office of Economic Development, whose mission includes bolstering farm income and our local food economy. The new non-profit Horse Country, Inc. has done much to open up our horse farms to the general community and more generally to promote the public’s awareness of the importance of agritourism. We need to continue to be aware of and support the role that agriculture plays as a key component of our economy and as the economic base that makes preservation of our rural land possible.
  • Connie Kell- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Richard Moloney*- I have voted for the annual funding of the PDR program for many budget cycles and I am very pleased with the success of this program. Looking to the future, we need to enhance agricultural productivity and I foresee tremendous potential in hemp production. If elected, I will work to establish a hemp processing center in Fayette County, which will be a big boost to our economy.
  • Adrian Wallace- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Chuck Ellinger, II.- My record on the Council has been one of supporting the PDR program. We need to continue to support it and the agri-business that helps sustain our economy. Lexington is very fortunate to be “The Horse Capital of the World”. We must preserve what makes us unique. Moreover, we must increase our focus on tourism to enhance Lexington-Fayette County as a premier tourist destination.

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Urban County District Council:
*Incumbent

District 1-

  • Anita Rowe Franklin- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • James Brown*- I have in the past and will continue to support Lexington’s PDR Program. In regards to tourism the city should look for opportunities to partner with Horse Country, Keeneland, Red Mile and VisitLex to promote our signature horse racing heritage. LFUCG, Fayette Alliance in conjunction with CLEX should collaborate on a true annual report outlining the economic impact of the agriculture industry in Fayette County.

District 2-

  • Josh McCurn- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Joseph Smith*- Yes, I do support the annual funding allocation for Lexington’s PDR. Lexington needs to support the Purchase of Development Rights and private sector farmland conservation programs to protect, preserve and enhance our signature agricultural industries, historic structures, cultural landscapes, natural environments and community welfare.
    By protecting and enhancing the natural, cultural, historic and environmental resources of Lexington-Fayette County’s Rural Service Area and Bluegrass farmlands, we continue to help promote the general agricultural brand and ensure Lexington-Fayette Urban County remains the Horse Capital of the World.

District 3-

  • J. “Jake” Gibbs*- I absolutely support PDR. And, as noted above I support holding the line on the Urban Service Boundary. Anything else on this topic is beyond my expertise. I’ve lived in cities my whole life. The district I represent is the only district that doesn’t even touch New Circle Rd. I’ll save you the blathering of the uninformed. Suffice to say I understand the importance of our rural economy to Lexington and will do my best to support it.
  • Renee Jackson Shepard- Yes, I support funding allocations to PDR. Making our rural areas more accessible to the public through efforts such as Horse Country, Boone Creek Outdoors and other efforts have done a lot to encourage and promote the agricultural and tourism industries in the Bluegrass. More efforts such as these are needed to continue to strengthen and grow these industries. As in most all such operations, it is always prudent to track results and periodically evaluate funding allocation to ensure funds are spent and administered efficiently.

District 4-

  • Barry Saturday- The PDR program is a great idea, if we use it wisely. There are two ways we can use PDR for maximum effectiveness: areas we never want to see developed for historical or cultural reasons, and areas where the city believes expansion in the future would make sense.
    For areas that we wish to protect, the process is straightforward. The city buys the development rights and the land cannot be developed without the city’s permission.
    For areas that the city believes wise for future expansion, buying development rights in those areas makes sense. By planning ahead, the city invests early, and expenses will be lower than later at the time of development due to natural increases in land value. We could potentially see large boosts to revenue as a result of the sale of undeveloped land after its value has risen. These revenues could then be used to purchase more land that the city wishes to protect.
    In areas the city owns development rights, council can designate the components it wishes to see in the plan, such as senior living accommodations, commercial developments, neighborhoods, connections with walking/biking paths, schools, and the neighboring farmland. After the draft components are in place, feedback should be solicited from community stakeholders in order to ensure we create the most comprehensive RFP for developers. Once the RFP is in place, developers may bid for the work. Work proceeds once the Planning Commission and Council accept a proposal submitted by the Division of Planning.
  • Susan Lamb*- I support annual funding for Lexington’s Purchase of Development Rights Program. This program protects our wonderful farmland preserving and managing agricultural, rural and natural lands. We have protected 30,000 acres and the goal for the program is 50,000. The funding sources used thus far have been general appropriations from city government, general obligation bonds and state and federal transfers. Creating a dedicated funding source has been tossed around for years now and I believe we need to create a task force to look into this so we can identify options.

District 5-

  • Liz Sheehan- One of the unique features of Lexington is the rich farmland surrounding our urban area. Because this land is so tied to the identity of our city, we need to preserve it. We do this by maintaining the Urban Services Boundary and through PDR. The program is already more than halfway to the goal of securing 50,000 acres since it started. This is an environmental conservation project to protect a finite resource. Once you develop land, the changes to the soil are irreversible. We should protect this land from an environmental perspective, but also from an economic one. Agriculture accounts for $2.3 billion in the local economy and relates to 1 in every 12 jobs. Two things we should work on in the future for the PDR: 1) education about the program and transparency regarding how funds are distributed and 2) maximizing federal and state dollars to lessen the impact on our local budget. Marketing what this region offers is vital, and is an area we could improve upon. There is a lot to be excited about in our region: the Convention Center Expansion, Horse Country, Red River Gorge, bourbon distilleries, and more. In my Marketing Research course at UK, students participate in a service learning project to collect data for local businesses and nonprofits. We recently worked with Bluegrass Stockyard to gather data to support their application for an official designation as a tourist attraction. These kinds of industry-tourist hybrid spaces are exactly what we need.
  • Bill Farmer, Jr.*- Yes.

District 6-

  • Gabriel Williams- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Angela Evans*- The PDR program has been an important program in Lexington. Due to budget constraints, obligations beyond council’s control, and prioritizing needs of the city, the PDR program was not funded this year. While I am hopeful for Lexington’s future budgets, the federal and state funds that also support the program may not exist, which I suspect would directly impact Lexington’s financial support of the program. Everyone agrees that Fayette County is beautiful but people want to experience it just as much as they want to observe its beauty. Whether its horse farms or adventure tourism, we need to be more inviting to our own citizens and others. So, I would strongly encourage continuing the Come Meet the NEIGHbors! and adding the perspective of other new generation, business-minded professionals, tourism focused organizations, like LeXenomics.

District 7-

  • Preston Worley*- Yes. Lexington’s PDR Program has been very successful and has proven to be a national model. This year, additional funds were not a part of the budget because the funds from previous years were not yet allocated as a result of delays in closings caused, in part, by the federal review process. In addition to funding the program, we need to find ways to assist landowners in dealing with the federal government review so that we can get these purchases completed. It is vital that we protect and promote our farm land. As Councilmember, I will continue to support this program and others that expand our agriculture business and tourism industries.
  • Chris Logan- I do support an annual funding allocation for the Purchase of Developmental Rights for several reasons. First, Lexington has a rich agricultural heritage and our city is surrounded by some of the most picturesque and quality farmland in our country and we must protect it. Also, agriculture and agritourism have a huge economic impact on our city.

District 8-

  • Christian J. Motley- A dynamic local economy is vital to open access to ladders of opportunity and improve the overall quality of life for all Lexingtonians. As we attract and grow new businesses and support a growing network of energetic and diverse entrepreneurs, the strength of our signature industries continues to be important. That includes supporting our agriculture and equine industry. The PDR program is a lever for land stewardship that also benefits farmers to diversify crops or invest in equipment or other technical solutions. We can also look to our signature industries for new and innovative workforce solutions as opportunities for growth in hi-tech agriculture are being grown right here in Lexington. That could have implications for job growth in Lexington and throughout the region.
  • Fred V. Brown*- Did not complete questionnaire.

District 9-

  • Jacob Glancy- I do not support PDR. Tens of millions of taxpayer dollars are spent by the Fayette county government annually to subsidize wealthy horse farm owners to sit on their land. The government is subsidizing the rich off the backs of the middle class. The government should, under no circumstances, be able to use tax dollars to take control of land and remove it from being developed by the free market. Many of these farms are owned by nonresidents of Kentucky. Some aren’t even owned by citizens of the United States. This program will make it much more difficult to recruit new businesses to Lexington because we have a limited amount of land that can be developed.
    The best way to enhance tourism is to invest in our beautiful city parks and historical places. Lexington is a beautiful community and we can continue to make it better.
  • Jennifer Mossotti*- I have been a relentless advocate for annually funding the PDR program. Since the program’s inception in 2000, it has been an integral component of our community due to the area’s distinctive farmland and high-quality soils. Each year nearly two-million acres of American farmland are lost to sprawling urban development and we risk seeing our important farmland disappear. In Lexington, approximately 30,000 acres have been protected, and our PDR program has been lauded nationally as a model for conservation. Lexington and Fayette County enjoys being home to arguably the most famous and productive horse industry in the world—our state’s signature industry—generating tens of millions of tourism industry dollars and providing thousands of jobs annually. Agriculture and the businesses that support it are responsible for 1 out of 12 jobs and for $2.3 billion in annual output. Focusing and expanding on these industries are essential. Historically, the general fund has annually dedicated up to $2 million dollars for the purchase of easements. Earmarking funds in the budget until the goal of protecting 50,000 acres has been achieved is our obligation to the citizens of Lexington. Utilization of a percentage of monies from the hotel/motel tax has been widely discussed to subsidize the program if general fund monies are not allocated. Our PDR program is essential towards protecting our quality of life.

District 10-

  • Amanda Mays Bledsoe*- Running Unopposed

District 11-

  • Sandy Shafer- I was on the Council when the RLMPlan and the PDR Program were adopted. I supported funding in the annual budget then and I support it now. We must preserve the funding that is in place for the PDR program in order to protect our signature industries. I believe a percentage of hotel/tourism tax dollars should provide part of the funding to support the program and it is allowable for that purpose. The rural part of Fayette County provides jobs and the base for much of our tourism industries. Fayette County Agriculture is an annual $2.3 Billion Industry that supports one in twelve jobs in Lexington. In order to preserve our signature industry we must allow for land to remain farm land for future farming. Additional ideas: 1. We should consider reviewing the zoning ordinances to consider the effects of non-agricultural uses that have a negative impact on farmland. 2. Educate: Citizens in Fayette County, while surrounded by farm land, are not aware of or are not connected to farm life in any way. Schools and our general citizenry need to visit farms to see the various kinds of animals raised here, crops being harvested, and benefits of their surroundings besides just being “pretty” countryside.
  • Jennifer Reynolds- I support the concept of the PDR program and its intention. The PDR initiative is a large part of keeping our farmland into the future as well as maintaining our unique niche in tourism. Once elected, I look forward to having conversations with the Rural Land Management Board, the LFUCG Planning Department and members of the Planning Commission to determine a way in which we can keep the program’s intention and funding without causing an imbalance in the needs and priorities of the city. I continue to be impressed with the increased energy around the Central Kentucky tourism efforts. A quick visit to the VisitLex or Share the Lex websites shows the variety of ways in which Lexington has embraced its history and character and has marketed it to visitors. Horse Country has helped connect people to the horse industry through things like horse farm tours which give a close-up look at our beautiful horse farms. Agriculture is also a huge component of our appeal to tourists. Once elected, I plan to support initiatives that link our agricultural community with opportunities for tourism, as well as engaging 11th district and Lexington residents in the endeavor.

District 12-

  • Monteia Mundy Owenby- I support annual funding allocation for Lexington’s PDR Program when state and federal matching is available. I am a strong supporter of Lexington’s agricultural and tourism industries. I am excited about the prospect of hemp’s continued success in Kentucky – I am hopeful that it can replace the loss felt by many farmers with the decline of tobacco. Living in the rural part of the 12th District, I would suggest more collaboration with the Kentucky Department of Agriculture and Fayette County Farm Bureau to promote agriculture and agritourism. So many Lexingtonians are unaware of the wonderful rural landscape that is located only minutes away from downtown Lexington. There must be more inclusion of the rural community in municipal decisions. For example, Farm to Table events should be held on farms and not in the heart of downtown. We need to let local farmers showcase what they do, instead of treating them like second-class citizens.
  • Kathy Plomin*- Yes, I emphatically support our PDR programs as evidenced by my last two years representing the 12th District, home to these protected farms. I would like to find a dedicated revenue stream for our PDR farm program so that we can reach our goal of 50,000 acres. But in the meantime, I will strongly advocate for meaningful funding on an annual basis.
    Horse Country has been a good example of an idea that has supported our ag and tourism.
    The recent approval of our Bluegrass Stockyard as a one stop Agricultural Center will be another boost to the industry.
    I would like to see some type of agricultural museum on sight. I would like to showcase Locust Trace as it seems to be one of our best kept secrets. We could look at community meetings being held there, community events, chamber related events. More interactions with our farms via food programs such as CSA is a direct link to our farming community. As a new participant I have a new perspective and greater appreciation for local farming.

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6. Citizens have noted frustration with traffic congestion. What are your specific ideas to address traffic congestion?

Urban County Mayor:

  • Linda Gorton- To address traffic issues, I will work with local, regional and state transportation professionals and employers to implement short and long-term strategies to address traffic congestion. I will also engage with other cities who have successfully managed traffic concerns similar to ours Technology: Cities are using technology such as smart traffic signals and real-time communications platforms to ease congestion and help with traffic flow. We must explore these technologies to find the best options for our community. Employee options: I will engage with employers, particularly our largest employers, to explore ways of reducing the numbers of vehicles on the road at peak times, such as flex-time, telecommuting and incentivizing employees to carpool or to use non-vehicular or mass transit. Transit-oriented development: We must adopt long-range planning policies to encourage transit-oriented development (TOD), which is a key component to creating a vibrant, livable and sustainable community for citizens of all ages and socio-economic levels. Our long-range planning should prioritize creating safe and accessible multi-modal transportation infrastructure such as bicycle lanes, trails, pedestrian walkways and crosswalks and public transit stops. We must also improve the safety and accessibility of existing infrastructure.
  • Ronnie Bastin- Part of my smart growth plan involves getting ahead of the traffic problem, as we grow, we must plan for additional traffic and infrastructure needs. Targeted infill growth on major traffic arteries would allow more use of public transportation. In addition, working alongside traffic engineering experts, I have a plan to improve the quality of Lexington’s traffic flow using methods that take into account the number of cars on the road, the time of day and traffic flows. I believe launching this method will have a significant improvement on travel in Lexington.

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Urban County Council At-Large:
*Incumbent

  • Lillie E. Miller-Johnson- I understand that there have been plans for over 10 to 15 years for improvements in traffic congestion, until I know what areas and what is planned it is best to wait and see, then make an informed idea on the areas that need changes. But I do know that it will not happen in a day, and there is the funding for new or improved roads and streets.
  • Steve Kay*- First, it is important to note that there are no simple solutions to the problem of traffic congestion. As Lexington has grown, so has the strain on our major arterials, as most people rely on personal automobiles as the best way to get around. There are, however, ways to mitigate the problem. These include: additional support for LexTran, so that the number of routes is increased and the time between pickups is decreased, making riding the bus more attractive; continued investment in bike lanes, bike paths, and bike programs, so that more people become bike riders and bike commuters; live-where-you-work programs, so that fewer people are daily commuters.
  • Connie Kell- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Richard Moloney*- Every community will have traffic congestion at certain times of the day due to the volume of cars during commuter and school hours. There are also a number of large construction projects underway in Lexington that require lane closures that cause traffic backups. The good folks in our Division of Traffic Engineering are actually quite responsive to changes in traffic patterns and can adapt signals to ease congestion, and there are several innovative apps that drivers can use to help plan their driving to avoid congested areas.
  • Adrian Wallace- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Chuck Ellinger, II.- Traffic is always one of the top complaints of our citizens. The spoke and wheel system we have can be challenging. We must work with our computerized traffic control system on synchronizing our traffic lights for better traffic flow. We can continue to look at traffic flow options such as reversible lanes. Moreover, we need to have our traffic light indicators efficient and working. On off hours, we can allow more flashing lights on some streets. As we continue to grow in population, we need to plan traffic infrastructure and patterns before we add additional drivers. Furthermore, as we have additional infill and redevelopment, we need to focus on public transportation.

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Urban County District Council:
*Incumbent

District 1-

  • Anita Rowe Franklin- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • James Brown*- The city and state both need to widen roads where amenable. Enhancing our public transportation system can provide another option to travelers. Expanding our trail systems and creating more bike lanes will give our citizens alternative ways to navigate our city and reduce traffic congestion.

District 2-

  • Josh McCurn- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Joseph Smith*- I fully recognize traffic congestion as being high on the list of frustrations for our citizens. We have made great strides towards addressing traffic issues. Further, I am confident we will continue to work to address these issues in the future as the population density in Fayette County increases.
    I believe we can improve traffic congestion by working to achieve an effective and comprehensive transportation system that supports a complete street concept and prioritizes a pedestrian-first design accommodating the needs of bicycle, transit and other vehicles. Developing a viable network of accessible transportation alternatives for residents and commuters is a challenge that I believe we must meet. To meet this challenge, our transportation network should include alternatives for mass transit, bicycles, walkways, ridesharing, greenways and other strategies. Some initial actions should include concentrating efforts to enhance mass transit along our corridors in order to facilitate better service for our growing population, as well as efficiencies in our transit system and traffic operation strategies. Considerations should include adjusting vehicle sizes and routes to best reflect resident and neighborhood needs. Education and public relations strategies can be implemented to encourage citizens to use mass transit and ridesharing with special traffic lanes during high commute periods to facilitate this method of travel.

District 3-

  • J. “Jake” Gibbs*- Drive less.
    If people walked and biked more there would be less congestion, and the attendant pollution, Walking and biking are healthy activities. I walk nearly everywhere, but I live close to downtown and I am inordinately committed to walking. I expect few people to go as far as I do. But we can make walking and biking more attractive by making those activities safer. I’ve devoted much effort on Council to installing crosswalks and bike lanes. Speed limits have been lowered in much of the city, in part to make walking and biking safer and more pleasant. I authored an ordinance which requires property owners along significant roads to shovel snow off their sidewalks. The ordinance is intended to make walking safer.
    One of the benefits of holding the line on development is that it will create greater population density. With that will come grocery stores, drug stores and other businesses in walkable areas dense enough to support them. Enhancing our bus system will also cut down on traffic. Increased density should lead to greater ridership, which can lead to greater frequency of busses on routes, which leads to greater ridership.
  • Renee Jackson Shepard- I believe that convenient and efficient public transportation is essential for our community. Not only is it a necessity for many citizens, it is a means to reduce traffic congestion and pollution. I think the current bus hub and spoke system is a deterrent for riders. We need to add non hub and spoke routes that offer riders easier, more direct options.
    In addition to modifications to our public transportation system we need to focus on creating compact, walkable/bike-able, mixed-use developments. These types of developments encourage people to use their cars less and make much shorter trips to do everyday shopping & dining and access services.
    Encouraging multi-modal forms of transportation is also an area we can improve upon. I believe we need to invest in dedicated (separated) bicycle lanes to encourage more people to bike as a mode of transportation. Indianapolis has an outstanding urban separated pedestrian/bike system called the Cultural Trail. Until we get serious about separating cars from bikes we are not going to realize our full potential ridership due to safety concerns.

District 4-

  • Barry Saturday- The first thing that needs to be done is council should immediately reject the 2018 Comprehensive Plan until it is reworked. The plan currently prioritizes development along the “primary corridors”, a.k.a. “spokes of the wheel” such as the 4th District’s Nicholasville Rd and Tates Creek Rd. Future development will look much like the zone change that occurred on Tates Creek Rd recently (passed by Council June 12, 2018 – for more, see question 2). Single family homes will be demolished in favor of larger developments that bring more cars. If recent 4th District history is any indication, this may occur regardless of the character, or interests of the neighborhoods, and without consideration of even nearly unanimous public opposition.
    Employees of the Division of Planning say it will bring more cars to our major arteries, though they argue it will somehow reduce traffic congestion. Senior leadership of the Division have said the goal is to increase traffic, which is more realistic, but is not a goal anyone I’ve met in the 4th District is hoping to achieve. Until I see a precedent where introducing more cars has produced lower congestion, this is a poor plan, and designed to clog the very arteries that we need to encourage tourism and permit Lexington’s small businesses to attract customers from all over town, not to mention the impact clogged arteries could cause for school buses and the delay of first responders for whom time is of the essence.
  • Susan Lamb*- Our corridor roads are very congested specifically at peak hours. I believe we need to review options about the timing of our lights. The peak hour lane changes that are in place on Nicholasville Road seem to help move traffic but we are limited on certain corridor roads because of medians that divide the roads. We need to continue working with the State to encourage improvements at major intersections such as Richmond Rd/New Circle Rd and Tates Creek Rd/New Circle Rd. These intersection improvements would help to move traffic much like Harrodsburg Rd/New Circle Rd.

District 5-

  • Liz Sheehan- Our population is expected to grow 40K in the next decade, and we already need fewer of us driving cars. We need to make skipping the car an easy and convenient decision. To do this, we can first work on our public transportation. To increase ridership, we have to speed commute times. If I worked at the Chinoe Rd Kroger in my district and commuted from my house to work one way, I could walk the distance in approximately 48 minutes or drive the distance in 6-8 minutes. If I took the bus, it would take 43 minutes with over a mile of walking to/from bus stops for a 2.5 mile distance. This is only one example, but it is indicative of what I have heard from people who commute using Lextran. This is far too time intensive for someone relying on the bus system daily. In general, Lextran is relatively low cost, but we could work on partnerships with businesses for employees. Crosswalks and bike lanes are increasing within the city, but there are still accidents involving bikers and pedestrians and persistent concerns over safety. An awareness campaign for drivers could help increase safety and in turn increase our number of bikers and pedestrians.
  • Bill Farmer, Jr.*- As soon as possible we need to embrace and employ intelligent driving technology.

District 6-

  • Gabriel Williams- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Angela Evans*- The first issue I addressed my first term in office was the traffice on Liberty Road in the 6th district. That 1 mile of road between New Circle and Man O War had seen more car accidents, fatalities and traffice increases than almost any road of its size in the city AND it had become a road MANY Lexington drivers used to get to Hamburg, and for 600 households, Liberty Road is the only way in or out of their subdivision. I worked with the Department of Transportation and my state senator and representative (of different political parties) to obtain funding for the re-design of Liberty Road. Much of the congestion within the 6th district is on state roads, so I will continue to advocate for my district on the state level and work with my general assembly delegates to help them understand the needs of their constituents so they can better advocate for funding on our behalf.

District 7-

  • Preston Worley*- Lexington is currently undertaking several street widening projects to add additional lanes and turn lanes on some of our busier roads. Because of the unique design of our road system, we do not have much room to add new streets or change our current streets and roads pattern. Accordingly, traffic management is an ongoing project year after year as we continue to grow. As Councilmember, I have supported funding for road improvements and will continue to do so. As we can afford it, we need to be creative, make innovated improvements, and constantly update our streets and roads to make what we have work better for us all. Additionally, we need to improve our pedestrian infrastructure. The more connected and walkable we make our city, the less cars will be on the street. I have pushed forward large sidewalk projects while on Council and will be committed to additional pedestrian safety improvements. Finally, we need to encourage expansion of our public transit, particularly into suburban areas. Currently, some of our suburban areas are not serviced by regular routes. If residents who live further out have the opportunity to use public transportation, they will have less need to drive, decreasing the amount of cars on the road.
  • Chris Logan- Traffic continues to be a major concern for all Lexington residents. Past planning did not adequately address Lexington’s future traffic needs. Man O War is a prime example. With no shoulders for damaged our stalled vehicles, and with little opportunity to widen, it has become one of our most congested roads. We must demand better and I will work to find solutions to this growing problem.

District 8-

  • Christian J. Motley- Effective and efficient public transportation contributes to the economy, promotes sustainability, and enhances our quality of life as a personal mobility option for all Lexingtonians. With emerging services across ride-share, bike-share, fixed route buses, and paratransit, we have the opportunity to begin to create consistency, efficiency and alignment for a broad set of equitable mobility options for all residents as one strategy to reduce road congestion.
  • Fred V. Brown*- Did not complete questionnaire.

District 9-

  • Jacob Glancy- There are affordable common sense solutions. If Lexington government would be serious about developing our land in a resourceful matter, we could expand our roadways.
  • Jennifer Mossotti*- Rising traffic congestion is an inescapable challenge in large and growing metropolitan areas like Lexington. A balanced transportation system is essential. Optimizing traffic-light management, using CCTV to monitor road conditions, enforcing existing traffic laws, improving perceptions of buses, improving cycling infrastructure, improving bus services, developing and refining park-and-ride are just some of things needed to help ease traffic congestion—and many of those things we are already doing here in Lexington. I support the use of Intelligent Transportation System devices to speed traffic flows, including enhanced electronic coordination of signal lights on local streets, large variable signs informing drivers of traffic conditions ahead, one-way street patterns, GPS equipment, and radio broadcasts of current road conditions. These technologies exist now and can be effective in helping reduce peak hour congestion. Lexington is fortunate to have the Lexington Area Metropolitan Planning Organization who is responsible for coordinating the transportation planning process for our region. Effective planning is crucial in combating the traffic congestion challenge as we continue to grow.

District 10-

  • Amanda Mays Bledsoe*- Running Unopposed

District 11-

  • Sandy Shafer- Lexington is unique in that it grew and developed around a 1770s settlement. What were local county roads are now highly traveled due to housing and development. We do not want to lose that historic quality or beauty of our roads throughout the city or county. I would suggest a “ride-share” program, better alternate public transportation options that include multi-use paths, expanded bus service, and staggered start and end times for employees of the major employers. “Green infrastructure” should be considered on EVERY new street improvement that would include 4-ft sidewalks/multi-use paths along with bike lanes to ease congestion of motorized traffic. We would need to work with other stake holders; the State, Lextran and UK to be working in the same direction.
  • Jennifer Reynolds- Unfortunately, in many cases adding more lanes is not a feasible option due to how we have developed our city; however, we can make a better effort toward streamlining our traffic flow to be more efficient and toward decreasing the number of cars commuting to work by making Lexington more bicycle and pedestrian friendly. I would support a project to collect traffic data on our major arteries in order to see what might be done in terms of making Lexington traffic flow more efficiently. I think our city could also improve cyclist and pedestrian safety as well as promote more park-and-ride programs that would allow commuters to park on the periphery of the city and ride LexTran buses into the city.

District 12-

  • Monteia Mundy Owenby- Once again, the study that will be conducted by the LFUCG Planning Commission to review areas of development and possible expansion should also give us guidance with regard to street, road, and highway infrastructure, which we are already behind on. These issues need to be resolved quickly with the cooperation of all parties involved, be it city and/or state. Lexington is blessed with an abundance of bike and pedestrian trails that are available for use. It will be a long time before all major roads can be widened and we have to manage our current resources wisely. Evaluating traffic efficiency is highly important.
  • Kathy Plomin*- Several years ago our city put into place the yellow flashing turn traffic light which really made a difference in traffic flow. However, traffic congestion continues to be a growing concern to our citizens. Almost everyone has their own car. And we have a culture here in Lexington that we want to control our own mobility. If you look around when you are driving, you will notice that the majority of cars are occupied by only the driver. There is also a stigma about riding a bus. However, Lextran is working on changing that perception. For instance, they have a financial contract with the University of Kentucky where all faculty and students have a bus pass and can use to travel anywhere on their bus routes. This is giving a passenger experience to thousands of individuals and a change in perception. We also need to look at ride sharing incentives. We have looked in the past at a regional light rail program and we should now revisit as traffic congestion continues to increase

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7. The 2018 Comprehensive Plan for Lexington includes a goal to create “a new process for determining long-term land use decisions” involving the Urban Services Boundary and Rural Activity Centers. If you support the creation of this new process, what are some of the elements that should be included?

Urban County Mayor:

  • Linda Gorton- Lexington was the first community in the nation to create an Urban Services Boundary. The USB has helped us grow intelligently while preserving our signature farmland and agricultural industries. The USB encourages fiscally responsible growth, using existing infrastructure and community services. The benefits are clear. However, as our community grows, so do our challenges. I support creation of a new process to ensure we continue to grow sustainably and maintain the critical balance between our city and our farmland. Leadership: Creation of this new process will impact our community for generations to come. It will require focused leadership to ensure it does not devolve into a protracted battle over expansion. I have successfully led Lexington through some of our most difficult decisions, such as implementation of the EPA Consent Decree. I will ensure this process prioritizes sustainable, intelligent growth. Intelligent growth: I support creation of a more objective, data-driven and systematized process that continues to prioritize responsible infill/redevelopment as our primary growth strategy. We need to better measure our land use to determine if we are growing in an efficient and equitable way. Prime soils: 90% of Lexington’s rural area is comprised of prime soils and soils of statewide significance. These soils are our most precious natural resource and key to our economic development and quality of life. Our long-range planning must focus on protection of our farmland and natural areas, balanced with a vibrant city inside the USB. Transparency: Citizens must have meaningful opportunities to participate in creation of a new process and easy access to information.
  • Ronnie Bastin- Lexington is rapidly growing in terms of population, and transforming in terms of infrastructure, neighborhoods and traffic flow. It is for these reasons we must be both strategic and thoughtful when considering how we grow over the long-term. First, we must establish parameters and boundaries for land that will NEVER be developed, in order to protect the landscape that gives Lexington unique character. Next, when considering how and when to expand the Urban Service Boundary we should consider: housing and population density; specifically the effects of these issues on infrastructure, housing prices, traffic and crime. We need to identify the “tipping point” for when the aforementioned issues would be made unacceptable by infill development, and make plans to expand before critical mass is achieved. Finally, I believe that before a new plot of undeveloped land is sold, that the buyer/developer must be able to prove they have adequate financing to finish the proposed project. This will improper land speculation and land buying/holding activity. All of these things, taken together, are an integral part of my Smart Growth strategy.

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Urban County Council At-Large:
*Incumbent

  • Lillie E. Miller-Johnson- No Comment!!! As I believe I address this earlier.
  • Steve Kay*- When the Goals and Objectives were being debated by Council I successfully advocated for this new process and for not expanding the Urban Services Boundary until the process is completed. I believe the new process has the potential to establish a broad-based consensus about the long-range growth and development of our community. First, there should be a comprehensive analysis of all land in the rural area to determine where, if anywhere, there is land that could be developed, for whatever use, without negative impact on the agricultural economy, on the view-shed, or on the environment, and without excessive cost for the extension of basic services. If it is determined that there is such land, a set of criteria then needs to be developed that would ensure that the timing of such development and the nature of such development would further the long-range economic, social, and cultural well-being of our community. Unemployment rates, housing availability, growth projections, and other economic indicators are some of the likely criteria that should be considered. The task of the group working to develop the new process will be to be wide-ranging on its thinking, so that not just the likely criteria are considered.
  • Connie Kell- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Richard Moloney*- I am looking forward to results of the study, due in July 2020, which hopefully will recommend a new process to guide future growth and development. I want to make sure that we continue to have a transparent process that includes public input, and that balances control of important decisions between the Council and the Planning Commission. I also expect an objective, data-driven process to evaluate land use and capacity so that it is not such a polarizing political issue that sets preservationists against developers. We need to work together for smart growth.
  • Adrian Wallace- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Chuck Ellinger, II.- As I stated in question 1, the Council added a new goal for determining long-term land use decisions. I went through the process of determining the creation of this new process. These factors or elements that trigger thresholds to adding land to the USB must be vetted well in order to have smart, responsible growth. They need to look at population growth, demographics, diversity, corridor utilization, affordable housing, mixed use development, infill and redevelopment and maximum use of land to name just a few.

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Urban County District Council:
*Incumbent

District 1-

  • Anita Rowe Franklin- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • James Brown*- I support the creation of this new process. I think the new process should include fact base indicators that can be used to prompt discussion about the Urban Service Boundary. Another element that should be included is a form of measure that is in place to prevent the potential of too much residential density and undesirable development.

District 2-

  • Josh McCurn- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Joseph Smith*- Monitoring and safeguarding the development and otherwise absorption of land involving our Urban Services Boundary and Rural Activity Centers is essential to ensuring a good and sustainable quality of life for our community and its residents. I support the creation of a new process for determining long-term land use decisions for these areas.
    I support the first objective of a study to analyze and categorize all rural land and to serve as the basis for the new process.. The development of the new process should involve diverse stakeholders and constituents, and a desire to meet the projected needs of agricultural and development communities. Preserving key agricultural resources from pressures of development, and identifying land for future urban development must be essential to the goals and objectives.
    The new process should designate rural land for long-term preservation, identify land for potential future urban development and specify triggers, thresholds and timing for the addition of the identified urban land into the Urban Service Boundary, and keep infill and land use efficiency as the continued primary objectives.

District 3-

  • J. “Jake” Gibbs*- I’m wary of the new process and will scrutinize it very carefully. The process will allegedly include “triggers” for expansion and we must be very careful about loading that gun. Population gain, by itself, should not trigger anything.
    As noted above, I am opposed to expansion. But if the process identifies small areas that have no better use than housing, especially on land that is not desirable for farming, I will be open-minded.
  • Renee Jackson Shepard- As I stated earlier, I think this new process is critical to our community so we can grow in a smart, data-driven manner. Understanding what the carry capacity of land really is would be a start to this end. Then developing tools, such as an optimal land absorption plan and monitoring the plan’s progress would permit data driven decisions to be made. There are communities around the country that have successful urban growth management plans, such as Portland, OR that we could learn from and develop our own process to fit our needs.

District 4-

  • Barry Saturday- The 2018 Comprehensive Plan as is will be a disaster for the 4th District’s traffic congestion issues. Until the problematic aspects of the plan are addressed (see response to question 6), I cannot support any part of the 2018 Comprehensive Plan.
    Contact your city councilmembers to request they reject the 2018 Comprehensive Plan by emailing this address: councilmembers@lexingtonky.gov or contact your district councilmember here:
    More at www.barrysaturday.com.
  • Susan Lamb*- Creating a new process for determining long-term land use decisions must involve diverse stakeholders and constituents from both agricultural and development backgrounds. Our community must come together to realize the values of long-term preservation of our rural areas and where infill and redevelopment can take place and what it looks like. We need to continue educating our community about the economic value of our agricultural land and impact of infill and redevelopment in our neighborhoods that doesn’t always have to be negative.

District 5-

  • Liz Sheehan- If the council determines a new review process is appropriate, at minimum it should include: community feedback; data analysis on current land use, economic impact, environmental impact, housing, and business needs; cases studies of models in other cities; and consultation with experts in city planning, traffic control, community building, and development.
  • Bill Farmer, Jr.*- Sewerability.

District 6-

  • Gabriel Williams- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Angela Evans*- I do support this new process but am disappointed at the time it has taken to have a full discussion about this issue. Admittedly, this is an area I am still learning about, which is why I am so eager to have these discussions to hear various sides, pros & cons of each argument. Until those discussions are held, I would refrain from naming elements that I think should be included.

District 7-

  • Preston Worley*- Any such new process must be thoroughly analyzed and diligently considered with the help of all stakeholders throughout the county. Conservation of farmland must always be a priority and the key element in our future planning and development. After analyzing how, when, where, and why we might expand, if we do at all, the next element to consider should be our housing needs in relation to appropriate transitions in zoning types and uses. We should always attempt to development complementary housing near existing neighborhoods and avoid dense or intense development near our agricultural land.
  • Chris Logan- Balancing a growing city and maintaining our signature industries is important to everyone and we must have a process that includes thorough input from all. Moving forward, infill and redevelopment must remain a top priority and be done in a way that enhances our existing neighborhoods. We must also ensure that there is rural land designated for long term preservation.

District 8-

  • Christian J. Motley- Embedded in the objectives of the Comprehensive Plan’s goal to create a new process for long term land use decisions is a commitment to data informed decision making, with perspectives from stakeholders and residents. I believe those components are essential for a thoughtful and intentional process.
  • Fred V. Brown*- Did not complete questionnaire.

District 9-

  • Jacob Glancy- Did not answer
  • Jennifer Mossotti*- I do support establishing the new process as outlined in the 2018 Comprehensive Plan via an appropriate study—involving diverse stakeholders and constituents—that meets the projected needs of the agricultural and development communities by preserving key agricultural resources from development pressures and identifying land for future urban development. As clearly outlined in the plan, we must ensure the study designates rural land for long-term preservation, identifies land for potential future urban development and specifies triggers, thresholds and timing for the addition of the identified urban land into the Urban Service Boundary, keeping infill and land use efficiency as the continued primary objectives. The goal is to complete the study by July 1, 2020 and then implement the process resulting from the study as an amendment to the Comprehensive Plan. My statement as quoted in latest editorial by the Lexington Herald-Leader sums it up best: “Our guide for how to grow in a smart way is what the Council is seeking.”

District 10-

  • Amanda Mays Bledsoe*- Running Unopposed

District 11-

  • Sandy Shafer- I could support such a process when it is better defined and long-term county-wide effects thought through. There are numerous cost considerations to be made for storm and sanitary sewers, schools, parks, roads, public safety, public transportation, farmland preservation, environmental and neighborhood protection, downtown viability etc. before I could support an expansion process. This process should FIRST evaluate all other planning strategies and means for implementation of those (including those discussed above) as our first consideration before an expansion process for either is proposed. I am not against expansion of the USB but Fayette County needs to be “caught up” before considering an expansion process and long-term financial implications for either the USB or the RAC expansion.
  • Jennifer Reynolds- Yes, I support the creation of a new process, and I appreciate the efforts being made as an attempt to respond to development and economic needs while considering the impact on neighborhoods, traffic, and infrastructure. I would want an engagement process to accompanies it. If the process is undertaken similar to the On The Table initiative, with all voices at the table, I would feel better about the outcome. If it is done in a manner that keeps certain people out of the conversation, I would not be able to support it. I look forward to continued conversations with my constituents about any long-term land use decisions and being able to share that input and insight with my colleagues on council.

District 12-

  • Monteia Mundy Owenby- I cannot definitively say whether I support something that has not yet been adopted by City Council. The Goals & Objectives have been approved, however, the Planning & Zoning Commission staff, as well as the Planning & Zoning Commission are still collaborating on the final Comprehensive Plan. I am anxiously awaiting the aforementioned LFUCG Planning & Zoning Commission study to see what the results are, which will allow me to make an informed decision as to what elements should be included. At this time, there are still so many unanswered questions and quantifiable data is not available.
  • Kathy Plomin*- Growth will be inevitable at some time in the future. So, I support being proactive in looking at the process of making the decision of how and where we should grow. Obviously, the growth will go out into my District. So, with that said we have to be cautious due to our rural assets beyond the USB. It will be important as to who is at the table making determining the long-term land-use decision. Perhaps, a formula like the one PDR uses only in reverse! Then a ranking system could be put in place with a consensus on the rankings and process. We need to move away from a contentious process every five years and hopefully this new additional idea to the comp plan will alleviate all the previous tensions on growth outside the USB

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8 a. For district candidates—What is the biggest challenge facing your district? What are your specific recommendations to address that challenge? For county-wide candidates—What is the biggest challenge facing Lexington? What are your specific recommendations to address that challenge?

Urban County District Council:
*Incumbent

District 1-

  • Anita Rowe Franklin- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • James Brown*- One of the biggest issues facing the 1st District are the negative impacts on vulnerable neighbors in communities that are experiencing revitalization. My current recommended approach as the current Chair of the Neighborhoods in Transition Task-force is to evaluate neighborhood redevelopment in Lexington, with expectations that the Task-force will recommend policy changes and programs to protect long term residences.

District 2-

  • Josh McCurn- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Joseph Smith*- It is very difficult to pick one major challenge facing the 2nd Council District. One is just as challenging as the other.
    The 2nd District is one of the largest and most diverse Council districts, and is home to great tourism and recreational opportunities. Geographically, it extends from West High Street to Jefferson Street, including Manchester Street, Leestown, Georgetown, Citation, Newtown & West Short, 2nd, 3rd and 4th Streets.
    As I work for the constituents of the 2nd District, I continue finding new opportunities and challenges daily that affect the District. Public Safety and Traffic issues can present very challenging problems. My district office continues to monitor the numerous police and traffic reports along the Newtown Road, Georgetown Road, Manchester/Old Frankfort Pike and Leestown Road corridors on a daily bases. We respond to citizen and neighborhood complaints advocating on their behalf with Traffic Engineering for necessary traffic concerns. I also communicate frequently with District Police Commanders, business, neighborhood associations, HOAs and other community leaders and residents about traffic control, speed deterrent signage and other issues Other major concerns include crime, redevelopment of business districts like Meadowthorpe and the Distillery, and the needed Public Library. As above-mentioned, we will continue to work closely with officials, business owners and neighborhood leaders and resident to address and resolve these and other issues. Our action agenda is “keep our ears to the ground”, listen to our District business owners and residents, communicate/coordinate with appropriate agencies and officials and respond promptly.

District 3-

  • J. “Jake” Gibbs*- My district, the 3rd, is the most urban district. It includes most of downtown and all of the UK Main Campus and Surrounding neighborhoods. My biggest challenge is helping constituents with problems related to garbage pick-up, Code Enforcement violations, noise complaints, and the like. My second biggest challenge, related to the first, is dealing with infill development. I absolutely support infill. It is a vital component of my anti-expansionist position. But we need to have thoughtful infill, especially with protection for H-1 overlay (Historic) neighborhoods. I think we should revisit the Downtown Design Standards that were rejected by Council a couple of years ago (I voted for them).
  • Renee Jackson Shepard- Maintaining the character of our neighborhoods is one of the biggest challenges in the 3rd District. The 3rd District has an asset that other districts don’t have and that is the number of historic neighborhoods that are located in the district. These neighborhoods are located in close proximity to prime infill development opportunities. Additionally, our district faces the ongoing stress of student housing expanding further into neighborhoods. While infill is necessary and smart, maintaining the character of our neighborhoods is also necessary and smart. Finding a balance between infill development and neighborhood preservation is a challenge but doable. Implementing proven best-practice methods for infill and having lots of communication with residents is a must. Again another reason I think having individual neighborhood plans and dedicated planning staff is a good idea.

District 4-

  • Barry Saturday- As I speak to voters in the district, the concern that arises most often is traffic. Lexington should decide: what is our goal for traffic? The first step, from voters I’ve heard, is contact your councilmember and urge them to reject the Comprehensive Plan’s prioritization of development along primary corridors.
    Next, voters agree that the wisest choice would be free-flowing arteries that allow motorists to quickly reach the area in town they’re trying to reach, then some local congestion as traffic is managed within the commercial or residential areas. Imagine going north from Man O’ War Blvd to Southland Dr without stopping until you turn left onto Southland. When returning to Man O’ War, you may have to wait longer to turn from Southland onto Nicholasville due to increased light timing, but that time will be more than made up by stopping at far fewer lights while on Nicholasville Rd.
    As of August, a green light during rush hour lasts nearly 4 minutes. Outside of rush hour, that timing drops dramatically. The shorter cycle causes massive stop-and-go for motorists, increasing exhaust emissions and making shoppers less likely to venture far afield to buy from our 4th District small businesses. We could increase the light timing outside rush hour to allow motorists to move greater distances between stops, while allowing enough time for those on cross streets to avoid excessive buildup. Once cross-street traffic is on the primary corridor, their drive will be smoother.
  • Susan Lamb*- I believe one of the challenges facing the 4th District is traffic management in the neighborhoods. The 4th District is bound by Tates Creek Road and Nicholasville Road and there are numerous cut-through streets. During peak hour travel times, more cars choose to travel through the 4th District rather than stay on the main corridors. We will continue to increase police presence to ensure those drivers obey the speed limits and stop signs. We also continue to discuss with Traffic Engineering possible traffic calming solutions. We have added more signage to ensure drivers know the speed limits and continue to update those signs within the neighborhoods. We want our neighborhoods to be a safe place for pedestrians and bicyclists as well as other drivers.

District 5-

  • Liz Sheehan- The biggest challenge in our city and my district is meeting the basic needs of everyone within the community. In my classes at UK, the fundamental principle of psychology I teach to my students is that if your basic needs are not being met, then you cannot thrive. Basic needs are defined as housing, food, and safety. I would add a sense of belonging and physical/mental health. I already discussed dealing with housing and belonging for seniors above so I won’t rehash those answers here. One of the major areas of concern for mental health is the drug epidemic. To address this, we could further support recovery programs, offer compassion to those facing addiction, explore alternatives to opioid prescriptions for pain, and reduce the stigma of addiction to support those who completed a treatment program. Another area of concern is public safety. While we were recently ranked the 3rd safest city in the nation, we have seen a rise in homicides within the city. To address this, we could partner with local faith and civic organizations working to reduce violence, and we could support violence prevention programs with proven effectiveness.
  • Bill Farmer, Jr.*- Traffic as stated. Crime/Security as we continue to budget for prevention. Infill awareness and hopefully acceptance.

District 6-

  • Gabriel Williams- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Angela Evans*- The biggest challenge facing my district is the over abundance of car lots on New Circle Road. Even though New Circle Road is just as heavily traveled as Nicholasville, the consumer options are vastly different, which sends a message to citizens that creates a socioeconomic & geographica tension that is difficult to overcome.

District 7-

  • Preston Worley*- The 7th District is a unique and diverse district with challenges unique to its various neighborhoods. Public safety is the biggest and most important challenge facing all of our city, the 7th District included. Our city, like many, is facing opioid overdoses, property crime, and, sadly, gun violence. As Councilmember, I supported an approximate $80 million infusion into our police budget to combat crime and addiction in our city. I propose that we continue to expand our police force with the addition of more patrol officers and the establishment of a new patrol sector to allow for more police presence throughout Lexington. Additionally, we need to continue to support and fully fund our fire and emergency medical services. As Councilmember, I supported the establishment of a new fire station and the addition of new fire fighters this past year. I am committed, first and foremost, to fully fund, expand, and improve our public safety departments in Lexington.
  • Chris Logan- The biggest challenges facing the 7th district are crime, much of which is fueled by the opioid crisis, and traffic. I believe the most important job of local government is to ensure the public safety of its citizens. I will work hard to have fully staffed and trained police force and provide them with the tools necessary to respond to today’s challenges.

District 8-

  • Christian J. Motley- The biggest priority for our community has to be our support and investment in our young people. I’m calling for an all-in cradle to career strategy that that looks along the entire path of a child and asks at each point along that path, how are we supporting kids. That requires a commitment to access to high quality early care and education, community-based partnerships for mentorship and enrichment, and career-connected learning. True community support for kids values the entire ecosystem around that child, and I look forward to building new partnerships that advance better and more equitable solutions for children and youth.
  • Fred V. Brown*- Did not complete questionnaire.

District 9-

  • Jacob Glancy- The concerns we have regarding public safety and fiscal responsibility have largely been ignored downtown. I am running to simply represent my friends and neighbors. Lexington deserves a government that works for them.
  • Jennifer Mossotti*- Balancing new development while preserving our current greenspace and protecting the quality of life in our neighborhoods is an ever-present challenge for the 9th District and our community. Lexington is an increasingly attractive place to work, live, play, and raise a family and with the influx of new families and new businesses who want to be a part of our thriving community comes the associated challenges of maintaining smart growth. With that challenge also comes the responsibility of ensuring that public safety needs are adequately addressed. And I believe we are doing just that. Lexington has enjoyed very high rankings from numerous national entities such as Forbes, U.S. News & World Report, and others for quality of life, best place to live and raise a family, and other similar accolades in recent weeks, months, and years. So, it’s clear we are doing many things right. But there’s always room for improvement–from basic services and on down the line. That’s exactly why I am running for re-election. To use my deep experience as a proven community leader as we continue building on the momentum we are enjoying as we move our community forward.

District 10-

  • Amanda Mays Bledsoe*- Running Unopposed

District 11-

  • Sandy Shafer- 1. The biggest challenge in the 11th District is to “know your neighbor” and to know what each neighborhood needs (and should have) in order to be viable and sustainable. Building/starting neighborhood associations would be a good next step. More organized neighborhoods need to be formed and interaction between them to forge relationships around the district could be powerful. There needs to be more opportunities and activities to both work and live together. 2. Plus, due to the large number of apartments, rental units and businesses, along with the diverse ethnic groups, property’s are not maintained and are in decline. There is no incentive for management groups to meet code for the properties or improve and upgrade to current standards. Starting a Landlords group, to work together on improving apartments and rental units could help with living and property conditions. These interactions alone could bring great change. District 11 could and should be a showcase to the rest of Lexington and Fayette County. 3. Bus routes need to reach all parts of Lexington from the Alexandria Drive area. 4. The District could benefit by having a Community Center of its own.
  • Jennifer Reynolds- As I converse with people in my community, I have noticed that each resident has a very personal idea of what the most important challenge is facing Lexington and their district. One of the greatest challenges I see is for the city is for it to remain unique among cities. Lexington is known for our horses, agriculture, healthcare, professional services, and education. If we focus on improving and expanding these areas, then we will also create job growth in other sectors. Similarly in the 11th, we need to focus on our distinctness. We have a wonderful opportunity to work together as the most diverse district in Lexington. We have great neighborhoods, a central location, beautiful parks, grocery stores, and numerous other local businesses. Opportunities abound to come together in order to work on common issues. The challenge in the 11th is bridging the gaps between the neighborhoods and the different people who live throughout the district so that they can organize and work with their councilperson to make the district a more beautiful, safe, cohesive, peaceful place for all residents. My goal as councilwoman is to build bridges and help unify the district.

District 12-

  • Monteia Mundy Owenby- Decent internet access is severely impeding the success of so many 12th District residents. Internet access is no longer a luxury, it is necessary for everyone from school children to small businesses. There are literally horse farms that can not participate in video conferences because of this issue. Like so many others, I can hardly get any work done from home due to poor connectivity. Unfortunately, 22,000 of the 25,000 Lexingtonians in the 12th District will not be getting access to Metronet gigabit internet. The current City Council voted UNANIMOUSLY to exclude those of use living outside the Urban Services Boundary. When I am elected, I will represent the entire District, even if it is unpopular with my colleagues. My constituents will be my first priority.
  • Kathy Plomin*- For the 12th District, it is the growth issue of expanding the urban service boundary as any growth of the boundary will directly impact the 12h District. Hopefully the abovementioned process from the 2018 Comprehensive Plan will provide a win-win approach to our rural-urban conservations and differences

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8 b. For county-wide candidates only—What is the biggest challenge facing Lexington? What are your specific recommendations to address that challenge?

Urban County Mayor:

  • Linda Gorton- I believe Lexington faces three main challenges at this time: the opioid epidemic; workforce development; and long-range sustainable growth. Opioid crisis: Like many other communities, Lexington is in the grips of an opioid epidemic. There are many organizations and citizens doing great work to address this crisis, but our city must lead this effort by bringing stakeholders together to work collaboratively and effectively. I have outlined a multi-faceted plan to fight this epidemic compassionately and to make our community safer and healthier. Workforce development: A ready and able workforce is central to our community’s economic health and well-being. My plan puts people first and focuses on creating a 21st century work force and attracting 21st century jobs. Sustainable growth: Intelligent growth sets the stage for community development. We must continue to grow in a sustainable and intentional way that enhances neighborhoods, increases quality of life, promotes responsible infill/redevelopment and ensures the future viability of our farmland and natural areas.
  • Ronnie Bastin- The biggest challenge facing Lexington continues to be crime. Violent crime and the opioid epidemic are more specifically driving the rise in crime we are seeing in Lexington. Crime has a direct impact not only on safety, but also the economy and quality of life. The greatest opportunity we have is also relative to crime. Crime has a direct impact not only on safety, but also the economy and quality of life. With the election of its next mayor, Lexington has an opportunity to tackle the issues related to crime head on, by choosing a leader with experience and common sense plans for reducing crime, keeping our children safe in schools, providing treatment resources for those addicted to opioids and serving justice to those who are selling the drug and fueling the epidemic. When crime is down, property values increase, schools are safer, businesses are attracted to our community and economy flourishes.

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Urban County Council At-Large:
*Incumbent

  • Lillie E. Miller-Johnson- Diversity!!! While taking classes at the University of Kentucky-Bluegrass Community and Technical College, Lillie Miller-Johnson was informed that as a Black/Afro American, she would be unable to compete in Computer Science (1996 -2000) or higher math subjects since and She quotes she was a Woman of color…. so I believe that this being what it is, creative workforce by establishing opportunities that embrace diversity with inclusion in our community.
  • Steve Kay*- Our biggest challenge is how we accommodate growth without negatively affecting the quality of life of all who currently live here, including those at the lower end of the economic spectrum. Lexington is currently growing at the rate of roughly 4,000 people per year. Given that Lexington is becoming increasingly attractive as a place to live, that number is likely to increase as well. Since the boundaries of Fayette County will not change, and since most people believe we must preserve all or most of our signature productive rural landscape, most of that increase will need to be accommodated by infill and redevelopment, which itself presents a series of challenges. To meet those challenges we need to invest more in both short-term and long-range planning and a related set of incentives that help ensure that infill and redevelopment occur primarily in the places that need and can benefit from increased density. Council’s Infill and Redevelopment Committee, which I serve as Chair, has been addressing some of these issues. As Vice Mayor, I also recently appointed a Task Force on Neighborhoods in Transition with the following purpose: “To identify ways to protest vulnerable residents from the consequences of neighborhood redevelopment and transformation, with an emphasis on preserving history and the culture of the communities.”
  • Connie Kell- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Richard Moloney*- In the next few years we will face several fiscal challenges, but I think the pension funding is the biggest issue in the next 4 budget cycles. We will have to reduce spending and come up with new revenue to meet our pension commitment. I want job growth and economic development to drive revenue, but we will also need to control spending on projects and programs. On the Council, I have consistently been the only one asking tough questions about the affordability of several big projects, and I have voiced my concerns about the pension fund’s impact on our budget. We will have to make difficult decisions.
  • Adrian Wallace- Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Chuck Ellinger, II.- There are many challenges and opportunities facing Lexington. The main issue my campaign focuses on is basic services to all Fayette County citizens, including exceptional police and fire developments, improved storm water and sanitary sewers, streets and roads. However, we must make public safety our top priority. The opioid crisis and the increase in violent crime are major challenges that must be addressed. Other issues that must be focused on is education, job/workforce development, and housing to name just a few. We are fortunate to be “The Horse Capital of the World”. This beautiful landscape encourages the quality of life framework to attract and retain a diverse community. Therefore, growth and demographic changes provide challenges to how we grow within Lexington. We must have responsible, smart growth and preservation of the green space. This will only occur with strong neighborhoods and encouragement of public input.

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