2018 Primary Candidate Questionnaire- #VoteSmart


It’s important for voters to understand where candidates stand on the most pressing growth issues facing our community. That’s why AARP of Kentucky, Fayette Alliance, Fayette County Farm Bureau, Fayette County Neighborhood Council, and the Kentucky Thoroughbred Association partnered to circulate a questionnaire to candidates this election season.

Know the candidates and #VoteSmart on May 22, 2018!

View Questionnaire Responses By Candidate:

2018 Primary Mayoral Candidates (arranged in ballot-order):

Linda Gorton

Ike Lawrence

Teresa Isaac

Ronnie J. Bastin

Kevin O. Stinnett

Skip Horine- DID NOT COMPLETE QUESTIONNAIRE

William Weyman- DID NOT COMPLETE QUESTIONNAIRE

2018 Primary At-Large Candidates (arranged in ballot-order):

Harry Clarke

Connie Kell- DID NOT COMPLETE QUESTIONNAIRE

Richard Moloney

Lillie E. Miller-Johnson

Chuck Ellinger II

Todd Hamill

Matt Miniard

Steve Kay

Arnold L. Farr

Adrian Wallace

Urban County Council- 11th District Primary Candidates
(arranged in ballot-order):

Bill Swope

Sandy Shafer

Charles A. Lloyd

Jennifer Reynolds

David Jones


View Candidate Responses by Question:

1. What is the biggest challenge and opportunity facing the city of Lexington and your district (if applicable)?

View Urban County Mayor Responses

View Urban County Council At-Large Responses

View Urban County Council- 11th District Responses

2. The newly adopted Goals and Objectives of the 2018 Comprehensive Plan prioritize infill/redevelopment as a primary strategy to accommodate our growth needs. In fact, studies indicate there are many infill/redevelopment opportunities throughout the city. What specific recommendations do you have to protect the character and context of existing neighborhoods while pursuing this needed strategy? Would you support a program that provides incentives for infill/redevelopment projects within the Urban Services Area? If so, what specific types of incentives.

View Urban County Mayor Responses

View Urban County Council At-Large Responses

View Urban County Council- 11th District Responses

3. Land use planning and economic development go hand-in-hand. What are the main economic pillars in Lexington and what specific planning policies support their growth? What specific policies do you support to ensure we create 21st jobs that maximize our unique assets?

View Urban County Mayor Responses

View Urban County Council At-Large Responses

View Urban County Council- 11th District Responses

4. Why are you the best candidate for the position you seek?

View Urban County Mayor Responses

View Urban County Council At-Large Responses

View Urban County Council- 11th District Responses

5. Like the rest of the nation, Lexington’s population is aging. In the next decade and beyond, a majority of households will be headed by someone 65 or older for the first time in our history. Our aging demographic has significant implications for housing and neighborhood design. What specific recommendations do you have to ensure we provide safe, accessible, affordable housing to our seniors in ways that ensure they maintain independence and social connections as they age?

View Urban County Mayor Responses

View Urban County Council At-Large Responses

View Urban County Council- 11th District Responses

6. Fayette County agriculture is an annual $2.3 billion industry that supports one in twelve jobs in Lexington. Fayette County farmland is the factory-floor of this industry, which also anchors a burgeoning travel and tourism industry. To ensure continued viability of our agricultural industries, do you support an annual funding allocation to the Purchase of Development Rights Program? Why or why not. What other specific policies do you support to ensure the continued strength and growth of our agriculture industries?

View Urban County Mayor Responses

View Urban County Council At-Large Responses

View Urban County Council- 11th District Responses


1. What is the biggest challenge and opportunity facing the city of Lexington and your district (if applicable)?

Urban County Mayor:

  • Linda Gorton-I believe there are three major issues facing our community at this time. First, is the opioid epidemic and related issue of public safety. I have outlined a multi-faceted plan to fight the opioid epidemic in a compassionate and effective way and to make our community safer. Second, work force development is central to our community’s economic health and the well-being of our citizens. I have outlined an economic development strategy that puts people first and focuses on creating a 21st century work force and attracting 21st century jobs. Third, managed growth sets the stage for community development. We must continue to grow in a smart, intentional way that enhances neighborhoods, increases quality of life, promotes appropriate infill and redevelopment, and balances the protection of our natural and agricultural land with the needs of our growing city.
  • Ike Lawrence– The biggest challenge is addressing the murders of 25-30 youth on the North End and the 70 overdoses, also mostly on the north end of town.
  • Teresa Isaac– It’s tough to pick the most important issue since all are mingled and affect each other. If I were to pick one – Safety is paramount since without this the people of the city cannot fully participate due to fear. Crime is a broad term that includes so many specifics like domestic violence, drug abuse, violent crime, etc. When I was Mayor, overall crime was at a low and Lexington was named the 7th best city to locate a business by Expansion Magazine and the 9th best city for business by Forbes.
  • Ronnie Bastin– Crime, opioids and school safety and the root causes are the biggest challenges to providing a safe future for Lexington. Violent crime and the opioid epidemic are more specifically driving the rise in crime we are currently experiencing.
    I know how to fight crime. As Police Chief I kept crime at low levels, some at historically low levels. During the last down turn of the economy, pressures on the state prison budget resulted in early release of many non-violent criminals back into our community. This began an uptick, especially in property crimes. During the same time, police resources were at lower than normal levels. With a reduction in the force, we had to do more with less and be more creative in our methods to keep crime down. The next factor was the increase of heroin use in 2013. The opioid trade has caused a rise of violence experienced in Lexington.
    I know how to fight crime. As Police Chief, I began the heroin task force, using a multifaceted approach and diverse partners to take criminals off the street. In 2013 as Commissioner of Public Safety, I continued efforts by partnering with medical, public health and social service specialists to create awareness programs in the faith-based community. As a result, participating churches now have resources within their congregation that families can reach out to for assistance and support. Police also began carrying Narcan along with Fire Department Personnel. The Health Department began a needle exchange program. The Jail sought grants to implement a substance abuse program and a medically-assisted treatment program. In combination, these efforts have save many lives, giving addicts the chances they need to turn their lives around. As mayor I will support all efforts to disrupt the opioid supply in Lexington. When crime is down, property values increase, schools are safer, businesses are attracted to our community and the economy flourishes.
  • Kevin O. Stinnett– Crime, and specifically the opioid crisis, is the biggest challenge facing Lexington today. Our number one responsibility in local government is to preserve and protect the safety of our homes, schools and neighborhoods.
    I fought for funds to hire additional police officers in the city budget. I worked to resolve the shortfall in the police and fire employees pension program. That program is now considered the strongest in the state.
    I made sure funds were provided for a K9 bomb-sniffing dog, Tilly, the only one in the state. I helped to start the Big in Blue program that allows police officers time off for mentoring children. I pushed for the creation of the LFUCG Substance Abuse Violence Intervention Office and helped start International Overdose Awareness Day at Jacobson Park.
    Second, we must work closely with Fayette County Public Schools to protect our schools and give our children the best opportunity to prosper in the future. The safety of our children begins when they leave their home and we must provide safe neighborhoods and schools.
    I helped bring the Career Academies to Lexington high schools. I worked to secure land for new elementary schools and a new high school. I established the new In-school Mentoring Program through Big Brothers/Big Sisters in William Wells Brown Elementary School.
    I championed the LFUCG child mentoring campaign with FCPS and the United Way.
    Third, local government must encourage a stable economy that stimulates job creation and effectively and efficiently delivers the basic services on which our citizens depend.
    I helped establish the Workforce Development Office, the Workforce Development Grant Program and the JOBS Fund. I serve on the Commerce Lexington Economic Council.
    I co-sponsored the establishment of the city’s first rainy-day fund. I pushed for the creation of the current debt management plan. I led the effort to construct new parks and trails and championed additional funds for paving and road construction. I was a leader in developing the strategy for fixing storm water and sewer problems.
  • Skip Horine Did not complete questionnaire
  • William Weyman Did not complete questionnaire

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Urban County Council At-Large:

  • Harry Clarke Lexington’s expected growth in population in the next few years will demand some of the most critical and controversial decisions our Lexington/Fayette County government has considered since its charter. On one hand we want the city to grow, intelligently and appropriately. On the other hand, the debate will be where to put that growth, relative to housing, businesses, offices, and the amenities that go with quality living. This debate will obviously be between the emphasis on infill, redevelopment, mixed use and the like and the expansion of land use by increasing the land designated as the Urban Service Area. I argue that this is not only the biggest challenge facing us today, but also one that will have far reaching consequences on the future of Lexington.
  • Connie Kell Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Richard Moloney I think the pension funding issue is the biggest challenge facing the city because of its impact on the budget over the next four years; we will need more than $20 Million just to cover current staffing levels. I think our greatest opportunities will be in advancing clean energy initiatives that will bring significant savings and efficiencies.
  • Lillie E. Miller-Johnson Something I advocated around 20 years ago, providing alternatives for growth economically while preserving the Historical value or environment of Lexington, KY.
  • Chuck Ellinger II. There are many challenges and opportunities facing the city of Lexington. The main issue my campaign focuses on is basic services to all Fayette County citizens, including exceptional police and fire departments, improved storm water and sanitary sewers, streets and roads. However, we must make public safety our top priority. Other issues that must be focused on is education, jobs/workforce development, and housing to name just a few. We are fortunate to be “The Horse Capital of the World”. This beautiful landscape encourages the quality of life framework to attract and retain a diverse community. Therefore, growth and demographic changes provide challenges to how we grow within Lexington. We must have responsible growth and preservation of the green space. This will only occur with strong neighborhoods and encouragement of public input.
  • Todd Hamill There are numerous challenges that bubble to the top. Public Safety, the Pension issue, and an aging population come to my mind.. But, the coordinated planning and management of the population growth is the very foundation of the council. As we look at land use, whether agricultural, protection, initial development, or re-development, the competing interests must be weighed in with the perspective of land as a finite resource. Population Growth and demographic changes are inevitable so we must not make planning decisions on the micro level. From an administrative perspective, LFUCG should always assure a balance between the net present benefit and the long term costs. This is the greatest opportunity we also have in the City. Density is a daunting thought when you value the peace of a rural landscape. We should welcome the challenge and work together to plan livable spaces that allow the individual character of the communities to shine. By creating opportunities for a life/work balance in each area of the city, we can allow the citizens to take pride in the individual community identity, and that begins to attack the crime, economic prosperity, and population health at a root level through empowering the residents to engage locally.
  • Matt Miniard– SOCIAL EQUALITY; LACK OF AFFORDABLE HOUSING, SOCIAL JUSTICE, LACK THEIR OF
  • Steve Kay Most people living in Lexington value the quality of life we enjoy. We speak of Lexington as providing a wide range of opportunities while retaining the feel of a small town. And we speak of the balance between urban amenities and a productive rural landscape. The overriding challenge for the foreseeable future for Lexington is preserving that quality of life while accommodating the growth we are experiencing. We have come to a point where we must make hard choices and hard decisions that do not sacrifice the long-term well-being of our community for perceived short-term imperatives.
  • Arnold L. Farr There are several challenges with are also opportunities facing Lexington. First, the city is growing at a rate of twenty thousand persons per year. The challenge here is accommodating such growth without compromising the aesthetic integrity of the city and without encroaching on farm land. Another challenge here is providing gainful employment for all of our citizens. Other problems include the rise of violent crime, drug and alcohol addiction, and poverty. Solving these last three problems require dealing with the way in which they are interconnected. People who lack a sense of well-being due to economic stress are more likely to become addicted to drugs and alcohol as well as engage in violent behavior. We must seek preventive measures and move beyond band aid type fixes. The challenges are also opportunities insofar as our success in dealing with them says a lot about the character and future of our city. How we respond to these issues will determine how well we have heard Martin Luther King Jr’s call for us to become the “beloved community.”
  • Adrian Wallace The greatest challenge and opportunity facing Lexington today is the number 83. 83% of our entire General Fund budget comes from payroll taxes. Approximately 75% of the General Fund budget is spent on personnel for the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government. This only leaves a quarter of our city’s General Fund revenue to operate our city. Depending upon the amount produced from our payroll tax, this is our greatest challenge and opportunity. Lexington must consider new revenue streams but also increase high paying jobs that will then increase payroll taxes and the dollar amount behind that number, 83. There are many issues like public safety, parks, pavement, PDR…all important things…but without increasing our “83” we’ll always operate out of scarcity and struggle to prioritize our policies that most effect the people of our city.

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Urban County Council- 11th District:

  • Bill Swope– Lexingtons biggest challenge also presents its greatest opportunity. Lexington is the 2nd largest city in the Commonwealth with a population exceeding 300,000 residents. In order to prosper the city must balance the need for housing and continued economic development with protecting it’s most valuable resource the agriculture industry. The 11th District is perhaps the most diverse district in the city. It’s multiculturalism should be celebrated and embraced. The Districts has a high density of mullti-family residental units coupled with a large population of absentee property owners in certain neighborhoods. This dynamic has negatively impacted property values and led to an increase in criminal activity in certain pocket’s of the community. Safe neighborhoods and schools are the conerstone of any thriving community and must be the focal point for improving quality of life.
  • Sandy Shafer– The 11th District is a very diverse district. The biggest challenge for the district are safe and affordable housing, jobs, and education for ALL its people; and yet these are its greatest opportunity. I believe this is true about all of Lexington – Fayette County.
  • Charles A. Lloyd– Probably the largest threat to Lexington, KY is a lack of reasonable paying jobs. This has led to a disparity of housing between super high end housing, and older or cheaper housing. This major factor has allowed the drug epidemic to take root which has been followed by the gangs infiltrating our communities and neighborhoods unchecked because of lack of money at the city level due to mismanagement of its fiscal budgets under prior administrations. If things do not change, Lexington will go the way of Detroit and we cannot let that happen.
  • Jennifer Reynolds– As I converse with people in my community, I have noticed that each resident has a very personal idea of what the most important challenge is facing Lexington and their district. One of the greatest challenges I see is for Lexington to remain distinct among cities and to focus on what makes it unique. Lexington is known for our horses, agriculture, healthcare, professional services, and education. If we focus on improving and expanding these areas, then we will also create job growth in other sectors. In the 11th district we have a wonderful opportunity to work together as the most diverse district in Lexington. We have great neighborhoods, a central location, beautiful parks, grocery stores and numerous other local businesses. Opportunities abound to come together in order to work on common issues. The challenge in the 11th is bridging the gaps between the neighborhoods and the different people who live throughout the district so that they can organize and work with their councilperson to make the district a more beautiful, cohesive, peaceful place for all residents. My goal as councilwoman is to build bridges and help unify the district.
  • David Jones– We must create more and higher paying jobs so that we can grow our payroll tax based revenues without increasing taxes as a city. For the 11th district, we must reduce crime and revitalize the existing physical infrastructure as well as older commercial and residential areas. Versailles Road is the true gateway to Lexington and the first view airport visitors see while traveling downtown and it should be treated accordingly.

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2. The newly adopted Goals and Objectives of the 2018 Comprehensive Plan prioritize infill/redevelopment as a primary strategy to accommodate our growth needs. In fact, studies indicate there are many infill/redevelopment opportunities throughout the city. What specific recommendations do you have to protect the character and context of existing neighborhoods while pursuing this needed strategy? Would you support a program that provides incentives for infill/redevelopment projects within the Urban Services Area? If so, what specific types of incentives.

Urban County Mayor:

  • Linda Gorton– I am a strong supporter of infill/redevelopment opportunities and efforts. Efficient and strategic use of the land inside the Urban Service Boundary is smart and fiscally responsible. Infill/redevelopment must be done in an intentional way that enhances existing neighborhoods. As we move forward with more infill & redevelopment opportunities, we must be sure to include the neighborhoods in the discussions….they are frequently the people most impacted. I would explore parking incentives and opportunities, as well as streamlined processes for builders and developers who want to pursue infill/redevelopment. I would also support funding of the Public Infrastructure Program created in 2017 to help defray the costs associated with providing infrastructure such as sanitary sewers, public roads, and sidewalks. With the proper administration, this Fund could help provide needed improvements to public infrastructure in our community.
  • Ike Lawrence I heard a strong rumor that we still have 2,500 acres left over from the 5,500 acres we let in – in 1995. Plus, we have many commercial and residential buildings that still need to be rehabilitated or torn down, i.e., shotgun houses, old bus depot. Look at what Brett Construction and the Setzers did at IBM! Nice. No need for city incentives. Plenty of land available for infill and redevelopment.
  • Teresa Isaac I know the balance and commitment to preserve Lexington’s rolling landscapes yet offering modern state of the art living. This is among Lexington’s biggest challenge yet such an opportunity! I am a firm believer in building coalitions that represent all walks of life. I would reinstate the Mayor’s Award for Infill and Redevelopment which was discontinued by the Newberry administration. These awards would go to developments that offer a vision for planned environments and utilizing space within the urban city limits as well as tax incentives for projects that refurbish historic or buildings in disrepair.
  • Ronnie Bastin Often in government, plans are made that are never followed through to fruition. In this case, the newly adopted Goals and Objectives of the 2018 Comprehensive Plan prioritize infill/redevelopment to accommodate future growth. The plan has been outlined and as Mayor, I will work closely with the LFUCG Planning staff to follow the agreed upon goals. I believe that inclusion of all stakeholders in the conversations about smart growth, infill projects and expansion is vital to make sure unanticipated consequences—such as gentrification—are avoided. Smart growth and economic success will be enhanced by investing in infill development.
    There are several recommendations I would explore to protect the character and context of existing neighborhoods while fostering opportunities for growth in Lexington. Many of these ideas come from personal visits through Commerce Lexington to other cities and overseas where compact building with a secure by design component have been successfully implemented.
    A priority should be to make development decisions consistent, fair and cost effective. This transparency is essential for creating a range of housing choices and maintaining our strong sense of neighborhood connection and inclusiveness. I would also encourage community collaborations in development decisions. Taking advantage of compact building design, mixed use building and providing a variety of transportation choices will be essential. Young millennials are driving less and want walkable and bike able neighborhoods. Empty-nesters and retirees want to stay connected to the community where they can have access to quality healthcare, educational and volunteer opportunities. Affordable housing must be available for all segments of the population. As we grow, we must plan for additional traffic and infrastructure needs. Targeted infill growth on major traffic arteries would allow more use of public transportation.
    Land assembly, capital costs and financial risk are often challenging aspects of infill development and solutions will have to be explored. Several recent national surveys suggest that consumers want to live near where they work with plenty of public amenities. This indicates a trend in an increase demand for infill development.
    I will support the exploration of incentives for infill and redevelopment projects within the Urban Services Area. I am interested in looking at incentives for development as well as buyer incentives to increase demand in areas targeted for infill development and redevelopment.
  • Kevin O. Stinnett We must be ready for the next 10 years of population growth in Lexington. Infill and redevelopment is instrumental to protecting our rural landscape and industries that make us unique. The biggest challenges and opportunities with infill and redevelopment is the cost of land and the planning/zoning process. Both require adequate capital and time when completing a project.
    I championed the current infrastructure fund that will help make infill projects more affordable and will fully fund it when elected Mayor. In addition, we must address our planning process and develop strategies to make it easier to do business with the city by speeding up our approval process and encourage development that fits in with the surrounding buildings and neighborhoods.
    I recently introduced and passed legislation before the Urban County Council to create an Energy Project Assessment District in Lexington. This will make it possible for builders and developers to attain PACE financing to improve the energy efficiency of new projects.
  • Skip Horine Did not complete questionnaire
  • William Weyman Did not complete questionnaire

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Urban County Council At-Large:

  • Harry Clarke– The city has used the terms such as infill and redevelopment often, but without a clear explanation of what those terms actually mean in real change. Monumental change is coming. The difficulties of maximizing available land and altering the existing landscape and infrastructure is going to cause serious anxiety among segments of our population. Current zoning regulations do not deal realistically with the kind of situations that will occur when serious moves are made to use and alter vacant and occupied land. Is it more painful to increase the Urban Service boundaries or to cause distress among constituents who are affected by or have rigid personal beliefs about density. I am a firm believer that by far the greater damage would be to expand the Urban Service Area, altering the character and depreciating the international reputation of Lexington forever.
    Yes, there will have to be new incentives provided by government, beyond what is currently offered. I wish I had the perfect answer to propose such incentives, but alas I do not. I can offer only the promise that if elected this will be a passionate cause on my agenda.
  • Connie Kell Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Richard Moloney I voted to adopt the Goals and Objectives of the 2018 Comprehensive Plan, which are part of the zoning ordinance and which provide very specific recommendations for future development throughout our community. I will expect the Planning Commission to apply the recommendations to all infill/redevelopment plans that comes before them; that is their function. Yes, I would support incentives, especially for programs that support affordable housing development and leverage state and federal funds.
  • Lillie E. Miller-Johnson– While preserving residential, commercial, physical and historical environment of the communities have an over-site committee or the council review the projects. I would, tax credits, HUD grants or other grants, CDC’s, property tax abatement, attract private equity, Land banking,etc.
  • Chuck Ellinger II.– The responsibility of the Council is to update the Goals and Objectives of the Comprehensive Plan every 5 years. I have been fortunate to be a part of this update process in the past. The newly adopted Plan prioritizes infill/redevelopment to accommodate growth needs. Since we are considered “The Horse Capital of the World”, we must protect what makes us unique. The rural services boundary is the preservation of this uniqueness and protects the character of Fayette County. However, in order for Lexington to be a thriving city, we must grow, but in a responsible way. We must protect our neighborhoods. We need to be aware of what we are adding to them. We need an implementation strategy that encourages development and protects neighborhood character. We should provide incentives that creates the appropriate development and upgrades infrastructure. However, we must always be cognizant of gentrification.
  • Todd Hamill– I believe the City’s current planning team does a very good job at looking at various funding sources. I firmly believe that if we want infill to be a priority, we must balance the funding with the protection of the rural resources. One of the biggest items I would like to see is a coordinated effort to define processes related to any time the ground is opened up, that a coordinated effort is quickly exercised to place empty conduits for future expansion prior to closing it back up. By having a plan that the private companies support, as well as the process within the governmental administrative structure, we can limit the construction within a neighborhood. There are technical and electrical needs that may be unforeseen, and by investing in the infrastructure up front, then the city can recoup costs through right-of-way agreements. Long term costs will be reduced, and speed to market would be improved. As far as the funding sources specifically, the coordination of federal and state funds, grants, TIF, and other public-private partnerships can be evaluated for both long term and project level use. To continue my earlier answer, allowing communities to have input into the long-term vision of their neighborhood will increase the local support. At the same time, the macro-level requirements must also be discussed allowing consensus to determine outcome.
  • Matt Miniard– The newly adopted Goals and Objectives of the 2018 Comprehensive Plan; Are NOT ADEQUATE TO ACCOMMODATE FUTURE GOWTH NEEDS AND LACKS “SOCIAL EQUALITY” DUE TO CONFLICTING GOALS; WHEREBY SOME NEIGHBORHOODS WILL HAVE TO BE ADDED TO HISTORICALLY SIGNIFICANT STATUS WHILE OTHERS WILL NOT. THE HISTOICALLY SIGNIFICANT NEIGHBROHOODS WILL BE PRESERVED WITHIN THE CENTRAL THEME OF PROTECTING THE CHARACTER OF THAT NEIGHBORHOOD, WHILE OTHER NEIHBORHOODS DENSITY WILL BE INCREASED IN CAPACITY TO ACCOMMODATE MIXED USE AND MULT TI STORY BUILDINGS. AS COUNCILMAN AT LARGE I WOULD BE USING MY REAL ESTATE SKILLS IN SUPPORT OF PROGRAMS THAT PROVIDE INCENTIVES FOR INFILL & REDEVLOPMENT, THUS PRESERVING THE BLUEGRASS, AND PROVIDING AFFORABLE HOUSING FOR ALL.
  • Steve Kay– There are some strategies that are broadly applicable in service of appropriate infill and redevelopment. These include reducing parking requirements, coupling development with available or projected mass transit, favoring increased density, promoting mixed-use development. But our overall strategy needs to be fine-grained attention to the opportunities and challenges presented by the varying conditions existing within the differing locales within our community. I would support incentives that are place-based and tailored to be responsive to these varying conditions, rather than any that are one-size-fits-all.
  • Arnold L. Farr– I would support a program that provides incentives for infill/redevelopment projects within the Urban Services Area. This is important with regards to creating jobs and opportunities for new members of our growing city. There is still enough space and unused properties in Lexington to grow and develop without compromising the integrity of our neighborhoods. Any decision that impacts a certain neighborhood should be made on the basis of conversations with members of that neighborhood. Members of the affected neighborhood and City Council can work together to determine what possibilities for development are present within that neighborhood so that development would not have a negative impact.
  • Adrian Wallace As the 2018 Comprehensive Plan prioritizes infill and redevelopment as a primary strategy to accommodate our growth needs, I would focus Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government resources towards projects that promote density and diversity, particularly along Lexington’s main corridors. South Limestone and Nicholasville Road would be a primary target area, as this densification would assist in creating more affordable housing, walkable spaces and a true need for effective mass transit. This type of development is expensive, and I would support public-private partnerships that create a collaborative approach to development that promotes economic growth and stability for the entire city. In order to assist in the subsidizing of these projects, I would recommend funding the Public Infrastructure Program.

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Urban County Council- 11th District:

  • Bill Swope– Design guidlines should be established by independent planning professionals and approved by a neighborhood plan steering committe composed of one representative selected by each stakeholder group. Recommendations shall be binding unless appealed to the full council. I would support programs that provide incentives for infill/development projects within the Urban Service Area. The incentivies might come in the form of Administrative waivers for fees associated with construction. I would also support tax incentives and low interest loans for those purchasing homes through such programs.
  • Sandy Shafer– Infill and Redevelopment MUST be neighborhood friendly to ensure a positive neighborhood impact. Any change should work to preserve the character of each neighborhood. This is done by using neighborhood specific criteria and guidelines, which need to be considered ALONG with neighborhood input to ensure its integrity. More neighborhood associations are needed so that every house would be under the “umbrella” of a neighborhood association! This would be one way to grow and educate citizens on the issues of planning and zoning.
    If we could add “more tools to the tool chest”, one I would add is additional living spaces on property inside the USB. This could be done by allowing connected spaces over a garage or in a basement to create more density. Freestanding dwellings could also be considered. This would allow single-family structures and zoning which creates additional dwelling units and income. This would not jeopardize the integrity of the overall area, but creates additional living accommodations while adding to basic services ie LexTran, schools and roads.
  • Charles A. Lloyd– Currently the Lexington-Fayette is running a deficit of around $36 mil this year alone. I refuse to “ROB PETER TO PAY PAUL”. The focus is wrong for these questions. We need to focus on balancing the budget, bringing more factories and manufacturing, and streamlining the creation of small businesses instead of hampering them. This then would lead to enough money to let the basic market factors increase the value of neighborhoods and then address the redevelopment areas. But as a rule of basic budgeting, you do not spend money if you are broke!
  • Jennifer Reynolds– While talking with neighbors in my district many are concerned about the effect infill is having and may have on their communities. They are concerned about houses that do not fit the character and appearance of their neighborhoods, houses and buildings that are too tall, too large, or use materials that do not maintain the neighborhood’s architectural integrity. One neighborhood association is looking into adding an ND-1 overlay to their neighborhood and others have already done this. I believe empowering our neighborhoods to lead the way in setting standards and regulations for new buildings is a positive step to ensuring that the attractiveness and appeal of our communities is not compromised by infill projects. Property owners can responsibly construct new buildings while not harming our existing neighborhoods. I support infill and redevelopment projects if and when they take the surrounding residents into consideration and are thoughtfully done and do not blindly gentrify, forcing longtime residents and business owners out of their homes. The 11th District has an Oxford Circle Feasibility Study because residents have identified Oxford Circle’s need for revitalization. I think plans are a good idea when possible in order to communicate with residents about the type of development they want for their own community. At the same time we should be protecting our unique beautiful farmland so that we can continue with our successful horse and agriculture industries. In terms of incentives, I would want to make sure that we were incentivising the types of infill construction that is needed so that our tax dollars are going to developments that serve our community well.
  • David Jones– There are a number of ways to protect the character and content of existing neighborhoods, many of which I detailed here http://davidisbetter.com/road-map. While mine were geared to the 11th district, they are applicable city wide.

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3. Land use planning and economic development go hand-in-hand. What are the main economic pillars in Lexington and what specific planning policies support their growth? What specific policies do you support to ensure we create 21st jobs that maximize our unique assets?

Urban County Mayor:

  • Linda Gorton Lexington-Fayette County is a unique place on our earth. Thanks to the foresight of early planners and leaders, we established the first Urban Service Boundary in the United States in 1958, allowing us to plan growth inside the boundary and allowing our agricultural area to thrive. Our main economic pillars are predicated on strong agriculture, health care, equine industry, higher education, a growing high-tech sector, as well as thriving small businesses and entrepreneurs. I have outlined an economic development plan comprised of the following strategies: (1) Put People First—align skills and education of workforce with needs of employers. Create strategic collaborations between city hall, regional and state partners, educational institutions, workforce agencies, economic development entities, and employers to plan strategies & create opportunities for all citizens. Create comprehensive strategy to address labor gaps, retraining, reentry programs; (2) Embrace Innovation—leverage our strengths to create a healthy environment for high-value, knowledge-based jobs; (3) Harness our Unique Brand— Our beautiful Bluegrass land is an asset we must use to focus on the opportunity for tourism and enhancing our quality of life. We also have great opportunities to attract global agricultural industries.
  • Ike Lawrence I co-founded the Town & Gown Commission in 1999 which Jim Gray stopped in 2011. I will start it up again and have rural leaders at the table with UK/City/Neighborhood/Student/Landlord leaders represented.
  • Teresa Isaac During my administration, Lexington was named 7th best city to locate a business by Expansion Magazine and 9th best city for business by Forbes. To support our unique city and the Fayette Co Agriculture opportunity, I have met with the Dean of the UK College of Agriculture to understand the needs of the industry, learn about the new technology and how we might promote our strengths to current and potential companies. I also started Minority Business Expo which allows minority businesses to showcase their talents and obtain government contracts and University of Kentucky projects. As Mayor, I made it a priority to visit existing businesses to determine their workforce training needs, their infrastructure needs, their public safety needs, and any other ways gov’t could facilitate their growth. As Mayor, I worked with UK college students who are entrepreneurs and featured their businesses on my radio show. As Mayor, I worked to attract new business to Lexington by offering them a friendly government and attractive incentives.
  • Ronnie Bastin Some of the key economic pillars in Fayette County include healthcare, higher education, agriculture, manufacturing and professional services. When a new business comes to Lexington, they are looking for the trainees they need, adequate, affordable healthcare and affordable, accessible housing. Each of these industries has a significant impact on business opportunities, the economy and quality of life in Lexington.
    Healthcare is a thriving industry in Lexington that every segment of the population should have affordable access to. Businesses can benefit from have healthy productive employees which brings financial stability and a better quality of life. The growth of healthcare businesses brings opportunities for innovators and entrepreneurs. I would strengthen our ties with private healthcare offices and medical centers in Lexington to market our professional and technological needs in this arena.
    Nearly 44% of Lexingtonians aged 25 or older hold a bachelor’s degree, according to recent US Census Bureau data. We must build better partnerships with our wealth of higher learning organizations in Lexington. These organizations will provide us with a workforce that includes jobs of the future because of advances in technology, machine learning, augmented reality and artificial intelligence. But we also need a more robust abundance of skilled individuals such as plumbers, ware housers, equine handlers, construction workers, childcare professionals and custodial staff. Workforce development will be a priority in my administration offering opportunities for youth and adults.
    My degree in Agriculture Economics has given me a unique perspective on agriculture. Agriculture provides an estimated $2.3 billion in economic activity. Expanding our local tourism options and the farm to table sustainability emphasis will allow Lexington to attract new businesses and expansion of existing small businesses. Urban agriculture should be encouraged so as to increase our green space, reduce our carbon footprint and create new jobs. This can improve food accessibility and community health. Continued advances in biotechnology, nano-technology, resource conservation and precision farming will be an area where we can excel in new job opportunities. I would form closer ties with the University of Kentucky and the College of Agriculture, Food and Environment to explore workforce development and grant and economics opportunities. Any new businesses should add value to our community without interrupting the beauty of our rural landscape. Any economic develop plan my administration develops would include agriculture as one of our integral, signature industries and would aggressively promote opportunities for enhancing our valuable agricultural resources.
    Attracting more light industry such as the highly successful Clark Material Handling Company (forklift manufacturer) and Aventics (pneumatic systems manufacturer) can provide high wage jobs. We must study the environmental impact closely during these considerations. I am not in favor of destroying our current land beauty to heavy industry.
    We also need to focus our efforts on supporting the approximately 8,600 small businesses, already in Lexington by making sure they can grow and expand. This will likely lower the demand for more business and industrial land. Most small businesses already have a defined geographic footprint, within the urban services boundary.
    Our ability to grow jobs and enhance economic stability will depend on our ability as a community to understand and offer flexible workplaces, technology, communications, collaboration and productivity in these main economic pillars.
  • Kevin O. Stinnett Virtually all of LFUCG’s funding comes from the occupational tax. Having a productive and growing work force is essential for Lexington’s economic health. I helped establish the Workforce Development Office, the Workforce Development Grant Program and the JOBS Fund. I serve on the Neighborhood Action Grant Committee. I serve on the Commerce Lexington Economic Committee. The main economic pillars in our community are healthcare, technology, horses, tourism and services. All benefit from one another and all must be successful if Lexington is to be the city we all want it to be.
    Having a stable, growing economy starts with promoting stability and commonsense in our city budget. As chair of the city’s Budget, Finance and Economic Development committee, I’ve been on the front-line of job creation and stimulation in our city. I co-sponsored the establishment of the city’s first rainy-day fund. I pushed for the creation of the current debt management plan.
    All of those initiatives are part of Lexington’s strategy for creating jobs and maximizing our assets. Moving forward, we must find a way to encourage millennials to come to Lexington and especially those graduating from UK, Transylvania and BCTC to stay in Lexington after graduation. We must be able to offer the jobs they want and the quality of life and affordable housing they desire. We also must find a way for businesses to utilize our Senior workforce for those Seniors wanting to continue to work after retirement.
  • Skip Horine Did not complete questionnaire
  • William Weyman Did not complete questionnaire

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Urban County Council At-Large:

  • Harry Clarke– My response to this question in my last campaign is still pertinent, as stated here in a somewhat altered state. We are a growing health, education, technological, legal, tourism and entrepreneurial community, enterprises that do not demand large scale land use or heavy manufacturing but rather smart concepts of infill and redevelopment. Economic development will depend on aggressive national and international recruiting of enterprises that fit that model. Recently, Bob King, the President of the Council on Postsecondary Education said recently that businesses are looking for communities with “business-friendly environment, strong cultural amenities and good schools,” particularly communities with “universities with strong programs in software development and recognized research.” Further, he says, and I couldn’t agree more, employers are looking for people “who are good with their heads; not just good with their hands.” He believes, as I do, that today’s industries need creative thinkers, strong leaders and collaborative team members.” At the city-led and UK sponsored University Cities summit this past fall, UK economist Ken Troske said, “We are fortunate, our wealth is in smarts. Gift from the gods.” The summary also concluded that “economic development here must focus on activating our abundant intellectual capital to create more locally grown jobs while giving low-wage workers the opportunity to develop more skills.” These thoughts relate specifically to the educational capital and the entrepreneurial spirit we enjoy, and come as close as I can imagine to what Lexington’s policies should be to “maximize our unique assets.”
  • Connie Kell Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Richard Moloney The Goals and Objectives of the 2018 Comprehensive Plan, which I support, provide our land use planning policies. Jobs and employment are what drive our local and regional economy. I want our biggest employers, like the University of Kentucky and Fayette County Public Schools to remain stable and provide the well-educated workforce that is attractive to new businesses wanting to locate in Lexington and the surrounding area. We must continue to fund workforce development programs and work closely with Commerce Lexington, our economic development partner, to support and expand existing businesses and recruit new companies.
  • Lillie E. Miller-Johnson– Population growth shows Lexington has a dynamic economy, demographic, human capital, infrastructure, this includes educational/degree attainment.
  • Chuck Ellinger II.– Since planning and economic development go hand-in-hand, we must provide the framework to help Lexington compete. Lexington has a unique agri-business economy because of its rural landscape. Moreover, it is a University town where UK is it’s top employer. We must take advantage of our strengths. We need a well educated workforce to meet the needs of the 21st century jobs. Therefore, a strong working relationship with the City government, the business community and the Universities which focuses on economic growth opportunities will help provide jobs for all our citizens.
  • Todd Hamill– It is important to differentiate between economic development to create money in the community as opposed to the movement of money in the community. The American economy is going through a significant transformation from manufacturing to services. In Lexington, we can capitalize on these transitions by focusing on our current economic creation markets which are tourism, agriculture, and medical research. The economic base we currently maintain will form the next wave of foundational industries through agricultural technology and research, organic technological innovations, and outstanding health/education institutions. These areas have global value, and we should seek opportunities to aggressively pursue becoming a market leader. It is important to point out that the City’s role should be to assist the intermediary organizations that do the recruiting. We must make sure that organizations are not duplicating efforts.
    In the realm of our service based economy, there are social changes that are fundamentally counterproductive to encouraging entrepreneurs to invest in service industries. The new workforce is mobile, project-oriented, and less inclined to work a traditional position. Technology is not only a disrupter, but can also be the grounds for innovation when creating solutions to healthcare, retirement, and other benefit challenges for this new workforce. As a governmental leader, the insight to the adoption of technology and its implications, allows me to identify areas that intermediary organizations can focus on for personal, policy, and economic development.
  • Matt Miniard– I WILL INIATE SPECIFIC POLICIES AND PROCEDURES OF TAX BREAKS AND INCENTIVES FOR SMALL BUSINESS THEREBY CREATING JOBS TIMED WITH THE AVAILABILITY OF JOB TRANING SO AS TO INCREASE THE LEVELS OF SKILLED WORKERS AND REDUCING LEVELS OF PROVERTY REACHING SOCIAL EQUALTY; NEXT; HORSE COGNISANCE AKA EQUESTRIAN EVENTS INTO THE CENTER OF THE CITY WHICH WILL HEIGHTEN THE AWARENESS OF THE CITY’S GREATEST ASSESTS AND LEGACYS ON THE WORLD STAGE BEING HORSES! BY BRINGING HORSES AND HORSE RELATED EVENTS INTO THE CENTER OF CITY IT WILL ENHANCE THE PRECPTION AND CONFIRMATION OF LEXINGTON BEING THE HORSE CAPITAL OF THE WORLD OBTAINING SOCIAL EQUALTY ON INTERNATIONAL LEVEL FOR THE CITY OF LEXINGTON.
  • Steve Kay– Fayette County has a diverse economy that is anchored by the University of Kentucky, agriculture, manufacturing, and services. Urban County Government presently has a variety of programs that support economic development. Within LFUCG these include Industrial Revenue Bonds, Lexington Jobs Fund, and Workforce Development Grants. We partner with the state on the Kentucky Business Investment Program, and Tax Increment Financing. We also provide full funding for CommerceLexington’s efforts at business recruitment. While all these efforts have value, we need to do more to prioritize and coordinate these efforts with a focus on sustainable development based on existing assets. A key portion of the recently completed Goals and Objectives for the Comprehensive Plan update envisions a comprehensive analysis of all rural land, and a corresponding analysis of the best approaches to continued emphasis on infill and redevelopment. I support this effort, and look forward to the development of policies for land use that ensure continued economic development.
  • Arnold L. Farr– As I see it, the main economic economic pillars of Lexington are agriculture, the horse industry, and the presence of a land-grant university. I support the Purchase of Development Rights Program form the protection of our farms. Lexington has also benefited from its technological growth and strong industries. For this reason I support the Bluegrass Economic Advancement Movement headed by Mayors Gray and Fischer.
  • Adrian Wallace Lexington, Horse Capital of the World, has an extremely diverse economy. Our largest employer is the University of Kentucky but we have many professional services, agricultural and other sectors that greatly impact our economic vitality. If our city is going to continue to thrive in the 21st Century global economy, we must have leaders who understand technology, how to attract tech sector employers and make true investment in affordable fiber-optic broadband internet. Lexington leaders must also begin to support our local farmers and incent local marketplaces and citizens to support Community Supported Agriculture, building back the on-farm employment that has been on the decline for over 40 years. I also believe that we can make informed decisions about land use in and outside of the Urban Services Boundary if necessary, along main corridors and in a controlled manner. This is an issue that seems to create contention among many and I believe with good leadership, we can build true community and cooperation to best serve all the people of Lexington.

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Urban County Council- 11th District:

  • Bill Swope– The economic pillars of growth in Lexington are travel, tourism and agriculture. The renovation of the Lexington Center, and the development of Centre Pointe are examples of improved infrastructure that will create job opportunities. The continued support of the Purchase Development Rights program provides for new and existing opportunities in agriculture. I support growth that is smart, balanced, stratgeic, flexible and meets the goals and objectives of the comprehensive plan.
  • Sandy Shafer– The main economic pillars in Lexington are its PEOPLE, public/private partnerships, and parks. Lexington’s people are our BEST asset and should have the highest consideration, value, and care. Lexington needs to provide housing that is safe and affordable, with education and experience-based learning that is available for all learning levels. Community activities should work to develop the youngest to the oldest and of all abilities! Knowing yourself and knowing your neighbor(s), volunteering, and learning to be a team player all move us towards a caring community.
    Housing should be clean and safe! There should be strong strategies in place to force property owner(s) to begin a process of standardization and cleanup. There needs to be appropriate infill that would allow the size and configuration of units needed. (Adding of granny flats, etc., as already stated.)
    I believe that a workgroup with LFUCG, Fayette County Public Schools, and the University of KY, partnering and talking more on a regular basis would help identify areas where we fall short in education and work force development.
    I would like to see GREEN infrastructure that would join all of our parks together. This would provide alternative travel, exercise, and stormwater control. Also, I am in favor of the downtown urban greenway as well as a greenway that would take us from Fayette County to Ashland. How nice it would be to be able to bike from Pikeville to Paducah (through Lexington) to see my state.
    Public/private partnerships that range from the agriculture based (horse farms, family farms, and tourism), to education, health care, service-oriented businesses and non-profits are what make Lexington great. I would like to see Lexington be more “GREEN” across all of those. This means a shift in how we grow and what we “throw away”. No more trucking our waste to another county. Let’s have better recycling for all residents AND businesses. Let’s create more reliance on solar, wind, or other sustainable energy sources to become a leading GREEN city! Diversity in new agricultural endeavors, i.e. brewing, distilling, and hemp productions are also big. We must LEAD, and I would support incentives to make this happen by making changes at the city level, as well as supporting changes at all levels.
  • Charles A. Lloyd– Lexington has a huge knowledge base. It is not utilized to the extent that people are traveling to places like Cincinnati, Louisville, and surrounding cities and states to make a living wage. We need to simplify the zoning. Feel free to take a look at the zoning map online. You will not be disappointed. It is a fiasco, no wonder nothing productive is getting done at city hall. Additionally, we need industrial areas for Manufacturing with reasonable travel times to people without a car. We need a bus rout that goes between Nicholasville Rd, and Georgetown Rd. People need to be able to go to work.
  • Jennifer Reynolds– Some of the main economic pillars of Lexington include agriculture, equine, high-tech, education, healthcare, and professional services. Lexington’s Comprehensive Plan is in place in part to help us maintain our agriculture and equine industries, so that we do not encroach on our farmland, but focus on creative ways to develop and grow as a city. I support the Comprehensive Plan and want to encourage smart infill development within the Urban Service Boundary. Both outside of the Urban Service Boundary as well as inside, we need to make sure we are giving plenty of attention to these pillars, so that more jobs are being created here in the Bluegrass. If we lose focus on what makes us unique, we will not be able to focus on growing our industries that are our strengths. I support the PDR program that aids our horse and agriculture businesses by preserving farmland for generations to come. The JOBS Fund offers incentives to businesses offering new jobs with decent salaries. If we have good paying jobs, we will be able to grow our workforce.
  • David Jones– Encourage and support local business creation – the All Techs, the Exstream Softwares, the West 6th Breweries, the Big Ass Fans etc. We need a shovel ready enterprise business park and 200 acres is a good amount for the immediate needs of the city. Flexible zoning also encourages a more modern live- work type of city or area, among other actions.

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4. Why are you the best candidate for the position you seek?

Urban County Mayor:

  • Linda Gorton I have the broadest leadership experiences of any of the candidates running for mayor. My leadership as Vice Mayor and Council Member (16 years) established my reputation for honest, inclusive, and transparent public service to the community. Partly due to my skills as a Registered Nurse, I am comfortable and competent working with people and making connections beyond the usual paths. I am not afraid of controversy and make decisions based on facts, input from stakeholders, as well as what is in the best interests of the community. My experience includes extensive budget work, including an understanding of the city budget. As Vice Mayor, I chaired all Council budget meetings after the mayor presented the budget to the Council. My entire adult life I have led civic organizations, using my skills to serve as chair of numerous school-related, UK-related, arts-related, social service-related and other boards. Plus, I am a mother and grandmother, who, along with my husband, has raised children here, so I am heavily invested in Lexington, which I love!
  • Ike Lawrence I am the best candidate because Mayor Gray’s liberal policies have us on the precipice of default: $600+ million in debt, increased payments to Police and Fire, no more revenue from UK’s Dormitory Build, and total mismanagement of the City’s four office buildings. These City buildings could offer walk-up windows to allow for interactive business use. I envision a Wall Street-like, electronic message board, detailing the news of the day, as well as a scrolling docket of the City’s business for that week.
  • Teresa Isaac I have the most experience within City government. Lexington was thriving when I was Mayor – the city was named in national publications as a great place to live. I led efforts to improve the health/safety of the city, increased salaries of public safety personnel, reduced budget, and crime was low. My leadership was tested with the worst ice storm and the tragic airplane crash. I work well under pressure but more than just working a checklist, I care about the people. All the people – no matter where they live, what they do, who they love or where they worship. In a political climate that is divided, I am known to unite people and work together for a win-win. One of my strengths is bringing people together and unifying rather than dividing. The challenges we faced are complicated and to solve and move forward, I would listen and appoint members to the planning commission to represent both sides.
  • Ronnie Bastin As a proven leader as past Police Chief and Commissioner of Public Safety, I have had the opportunity to be a manager of over half the city’s budget ($200 million out of $350 million), but also a visionary, leading people in city hall (1,750 employees). I have proven expertise in listening to community members to set priorities and then actually build plans that are implemented to change the culture of government and solve many of our most challenging issues. Coupled with solid interpersonal and communication skills, these experiences have made me the best candidate for the position of Mayor of Lexington. In other words, I have led large organizations successfully, listened to community members to set priorities and built consensus to solve problems, all without scandal.
    I moved to Lexington as a first generation college student in 1975, married the woman of my dreams and then raised two children. My family has been blessed to live, work and play in Lexington. I am ready to lead efforts to ensure that Lexington will continue to provide opportunities for current and future generations by focusing on how we improve public safety through crime reduction efforts, exploring options to reduce opioid use and partnering with the school system to make sure schools are a safe place for our children to learn. I will also focus on how we plan for smart growth to ensure a robust economy and workforce development, while valuing current amenities that citizens want and need in enjoying a positive quality of life.
    There are many illustrations of my responsiveness to Lexington’s challenges.
    -I was the only mayoral candidate who attended all six of the Fayette County Public Schools Safety Advisory Council meetings where best practices in school safety were discussed.
    -As Police Chief, I managed to come in under budget during the recession by cutting waste and maximizing resources to fight crime. I even turned in excess budget allocations that were not used so they could be reassigned to meet other city needs. The next mayor must be fiscally responsible and able to communicate the importance of line items for council support. I will work with Chief Lawrence Weathers, who is well suited to lead the police department.
    -My Police Chief’s Command Staff was intentionally diverse. I devoted much time to professionally developing all police. Many have gone on to lead other organizations.
    -When our Police Officers began to not have the language to meet the needs of the Hispanic community, I developed and implemented the Hispanic Language Program, which won a national award of excellence from Harvard University.
    -As Commissioner of Public Safety, I began to explore innovative ways to address the opioid crisis. I brought together diverse partners to work towards a common goal of confronting this issue that affects crime, employability and education. The victims include not only themselves but their families and friends from all walks of life. It greatly impacts all aspects of our community. This is just a start.
    -After seeing a similar program in another city, I encouraged the Fire Department to access grant dollars to investigate evidence-based practices to reduce the number of frequent flyers using our ambulance service. There are approximately 200 of these individuals. Often these individuals don’t need emergency care but have forgotten to take their medicine, are lonely or need transportation. Since It costs about $1,000 an ambulance run, being creative in reducing these numbers will greatly reduce dollars spent in this mostly unnecessary fashion.
    I am the only Mayoral candidate who has a proven track record of finding solutions that can be implemented to improve quality of life issues while being fiscally responsible with Lexington’s tax dollars. I don’t have to talk about bringing people together to make a difference in the quality of life in Lexington. I have lived it! I am the best candidate for Mayor for Lexington.
  • Kevin O. StinnettWe have a very clear choice in this mayoral election. Other candidates are about where we have been, I am about where we are going. We have the opportunity to move Lexington forward with new enthusiasm and new energy. We have the opportunity to elect someone with proven experience getting results. We’re poised to meet the challenges of the future with a fresh perspective and new ideas.
    We need to aggressively expand our attack on crime and the opioid crisis.
    We have to build a stronger alliance with our schools to address safety and the education of our children in general.
    And we have to assure our economic future by promoting jobs and opportunities for every Lexingtonian.
    We are not done yet with Lexington. We can be better. We can do better. And we will, when I am your Mayor.
    To move forward we have to keep looking forward. We need a mayor who works as hard as you work and cares as much as you care.
    My message is a simple one – We’re not done yet making Lexington the great city we want it to be. Our strength is the bonds we share, Our future is the one we must build together.
  • Skip Horine Did not complete questionnaire.
  • William Weyman Did not complete questionnaire.

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Urban County Council At-Large:

  • Harry Clarke– I spent 43 years as a member of the faculty and an administrator in the School of Music at UK, dealing not only with the students, but the faculty of several colleges, the UK Administration, the Alumni Association, the Athletic Department, and the Development Office. My experience as a member of the Council brought the endorsement of the Herald-Leader with the comment that I was “remarkably astute and effective. Thoughtful, open-minded, attuned to details while also seeing the big picture.” I hope those comments are true and as such give me the momentum to continue those qualities if elected. I currently hold membership on eight different boards and commissions, including the Board of Adjustment, the Water Quality Fees Board, the Tree Board, the Board of the Friends of the Arboretum, and this involvement should demonstrate my interest in public service and give me perspective beyond the norm.
  • Connie Kell Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Richard Moloney– Experience is what sets me apart from the other candidates. I have a proven track record for taking a balanced approach to addressing tough issues facing our community.
  • Lillie E. Miller-Johnson– I am the Person for this position because I am not just concerned I have worked diligently for better housing and educational goals, I will constantly seek to make Lexington one of the top cities to live in.
  • Chuck Ellinger II.– I believe I am the best candidate because of my background and experience. My record on the Council for 12 years was one of dependability, accountability and fiscal responsibility. I have a common sense approach to problem solving. I encourage an open dialogue of all viewpoints and have an open mind on issues. In order for Lexington to be successful, we must be open and accountable to all our citizens.
  • Todd Hamill– I am not entering this race due to dissatisfaction with the current administration or planning. I feel that we are making a generational change in the workforce, the retirement community, and the general population demographics. These changes mean that what worked in the past, may not provide the same results in the future. I have 25 years of business experience in the IT industry and understand what technological disruption does organizationally and socially. Our leaders must understand this fundamental fact as well. In addition to my business knowledge, I have led one of the largest recreational basketball leagues (and other youth programs) in Lexington for over 15 years. My professional career has provided me to work with public safety organizations across the Commonwealth, including here in Lexington. These life experiences have prepared me to offer a unique perspective to the LFUCG Council decision process. I can see perspectives that allow understanding of concerns from all of our citizens.
  • Matt Miniard– NO OTHER CANDIDATE HAS THE HANDS ON EXPERIENCE WITH INFIELD DEVELOPMENT AND REDEVELOPMENT, NOR THE EDUCATION AND BACKGROUND THAN ME! AGAIN, I WILL USE MY LIFETIME OF EXPERENCE AS A REAL ESTATE PROFESSIONAL TO REACHINGTO MEETS THE NEEDS OF LEXINGTON GROWTH GOALS. I COME FROM HUMBLE BEGININGS, I AM A SELF MAN, AND I KNOW HOW TO GET THINGS DONE! WHEREBY THE LEVEL OF SOCIAL EQUALITY WILL INCREASE UNDER MY DIRECTION, WITH MORE PEOPLE HAVING AFFORABLE HOUSING INSIDE THE URBAN SERVICE AREA.
  • Steve Kay– I have had a long and successful career in the private sector as a consultant and facilitator providing advice, support, and assistance to many non-profit organizations, governmental agencies, private businesses, and multi-stakeholder groups working on difficult issues in our community. Since being elected to council in 2010 I have been effective in moving forward a number of major initiatives that have benefited our community, such as creation of the Office of Affordable Housing, theOffice of Homeless Prevention and Intervention, and the position of Local Food Coordinator in the Mayor’s Office of Economic Development. As Vice Mayor since 2014 I have provided fair and steady leadership for the council. I work well with my colleagues on council and with the administration. I have a clear vision for the best ways to maintain the excellent quality of life we enjoy and the best ways to build on those assets as we move to becoming one of the world’s great cities.
  • Arnold L. Farr– I think that I have a balanced perspective. The character of a city or community is determined by how it takes care of all of its citizens. For that reason, I have always worked to overcome poverty and any form of injustice. Three of the problems that I mentioned earlier, violence, drug and alcohol addiction, and poverty are often as separate issues. I believe that they are interconnected and that you can’t effectively solve one without solving the others. This is a matter that is very important to me and it is one that I will dedicate myself to. I am also very good with people of all types and believe in interacting with them and learning from them. My down to earth manner creates a level of comfort for people even if we are quite different. This is an important quality for someone holding public office. People have always felt that they could talk with me. Also I believe that if I can’t get something done by myself then I need to form an alliance with others. For example, a short while back our local government voted to raise the minimum wage here in Lexington. The State did not approve. The wage problem is too important to give up on. My strategy would be to form a coalition with Mayors and City Council members from other towns who are like minded to put pressure on the State.
  • Adrian Wallace– In the Commonwealth of Kentucky, we have a saying, “United We Stand, Divided We Fall” and I believe that more unites Lexingtonians than anything that could ever divide us.
    The reality is that we all want to live in a place where we can raise our families, safe from harm, in good schools and comfortable homes. We all want an efficient government that properly stewards the tax dollars that we invest into the city of Lexington. The majority of our community shares common goals and we need leadership that champions this belief.
    This, among many others, is the reason I believe I am the best candidate to represent the city of Lexington as an at-large council member, the place that I call my Old Kentucky Home. I am the strongest candidate because I don’t believe we need any more politicians but rather public servants, people who believe in building community, promoting economic growth and stability and expanding educational opportunity.

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Urban County Council- 11th District:

  • Bill Swope– 31 years of experience in local and state government in management and executive levels positions has provided valuable insight into the functions of government. I have demonstrated the ability to comprehend complex issues while effectively communicating solutions to those challenges. I have futher demonstrated the ability to identify consensus based resolution while satisfying the concerns of diverse interest groups. A seat on council represents a commitment and willingness to serve. A close examination of my adult life suggest that i have a history of practicing this principle.
  • Sandy ShaferI was elected to the 10th District Council seat in 1994 and held that seat till 2006 when I was “termed out”. That is 13 years of being an elected official, which is as long as you are in school, K-12. I will bring knowledge of this job, and the ability to work with citizens, council and a mayor, as well as state and congressional leadership.
    I have 13 years of experience with RESULTS (look at Southland Drive).
    • I was instrumental in Fayette County becoming the first KY County to have a smoking band in place.
    • I created more neighborhood associations than any other council member, Picadome NA which I started in 1988 , before I was on the council.
    • I lead the efforts to build four Creative Playgrounds in 1988, 1991, 1992, and 1994.
    • I started Friends of the Parks in Fayette County, Inc., which has brought grant monies into our parks over the last 25 years. We still see the benefits of this organization. In 2016 and 2017, Friends planted 500 trees at Shillito Park and another 225 trees are to be planted along the Legacy Trail in October 2018. My motto has been and still is “LEX Build It Together”.
    A
    These are just a few of my accomplishments; for more you can go to www.electsandy.com
    On a more personal note, I am a home grown Lexingtonian and am a graduate of Lafayette High School and was in the band. I attended the University of KY, and was in the UK band and am in the Alumni Band now. I am married to Paul Shafer and have 4 grown children and 9 grandchildren, with one more due in JUNE.
  • Charles A. Lloyd– I work a lot, live in and own a small business in one of the poorest sections in lexington, am a natural problem solver, believe in doing things right the first time, hate theft (legal or illegal), and to quote a former professor, I have no filter when it comes to speaking the truth.
  • Jennifer Reynolds– I am the best candidate for 11th District Urban County Council because I will be able to effectively build bridges between the diverse people groups of the district. The 11th District is Lexington’s most diverse district, and I want all of District 11 to have representation in City Council. My experience in community outreach, my experience working in 11th district community, and my education in anthropology and Spanish have prepared me to serve our city as a bilingual member of City Council in our beautiful, diverse district where I will bring new energy and ideas.
  • David Jones– I am a 20 year district 11 resident, and I bring 27 years of proven and successful business experience as well as a law degree to the job, with over $100 million in privately funded projects brought to completion. Out of 5 candidates for the office I am the only one who has proposed an actual concrete plan of action that will enhance our district, lower crime and increase the quality of life.

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5. Like the rest of the nation, Lexington’s population is aging. In the next decade and beyond, a majority of households will be headed by someone 65 or older for the first time in our history. Our aging demographic has significant implications for housing and neighborhood design. What specific recommendations do you have to ensure we provide safe, accessible, affordable housing to our seniors in ways that ensure they maintain independence and social connections as they age?

Urban County Mayor:

  • Linda Gorton I chaired the Senior Services Commission and this is a great concern that we “get it right” in Lexington to make our city a place that is safe for and welcomes the over – 65 crowd. Considering policies that are pedestrian and bus transportation-friendly, as well as accessory dwelling unit considerations are all areas of important policy. We must consider what affordable housing incentives are successful in other communities. Consider establishing more Senior Citizen Center satellite facilities.
  • Ike Lawrence I am a big proponent of grandparents and/or older in-laws or widows/widowers living with their adult children and grandchildren (like the Waltons on TV). Maybe a 10-20% discount on the tax bill each year. They could live in basement or garage/rear apartment to have some sort of independent living.
  • Teresa Isaac I support low interest loans, home improvement grants, and equipment loans to make the homes of seniors accessible so they may stay in their neighborhoods longer. I support programs like “repair affair” and the “ramp program” that make repairs and modifications for seniors at no cost. I also support programs that promote equitable development for seniors offering options to serve all budgets. As Mayor I would offer awards for creative ideas and programs that allow seniors to age gracefully maintaining independence, purpose and social connections. When I was Mayor, Lexington was named one of the participants in the “aging in place” program to study and implement ideas to help seniors have adequate nutrition, recreational opportunities, and social connections.
  • Ronnie Bastin Lexington is full of culturally diverse and socioeconomic levels of individuals and families. In addition, health may decline as one ages, requiring various levels of assistance. While Lexington has many assisted and personal care options, along with senior apartments, these options may be fiscally out of the reach of many community members. Before we can move forward, Lexington should explore who and how many of these seniors want to grow old in Lexington and what their needs are. Then we can begin to offer resources to assist in meeting their needs. There are a wide variety of models being built around the country from multigenerational communities to mini-neighborhoods to neighborhood revitalizations. There are also proven attributes of sustainable communities that should be considered. This is part of secure by design housing which considers well designed routes with spaces that provide convenient movement without compromising security and promoting a sense of ownership. Older homes could be retrofitted while newer homes could be designed with the safety and needs of seniors in mind. Seniors or not, all in Lexington has the right to affordable housing.
  • Kevin O. Stinnett This is one of the first items my administration will work on when elected Mayor. We have a crisis in the Senior housing market in Lexington. Middle class Seniors are often unable to move out of their existing homes into affordable Senior living.
    We have a shortage of Senior residential living in Lexington. We have high-end Senior living options and subsidized Senior living options, but no options for the bulk of our middle-class Seniors.
    Many of our great older neighborhoods like Eastland, Gardenside, Southland Dr., and Pasadena are all good examples of this problem. Seniors have the affordable houses that millennials desire, but lack options for where to move if they choose to sell. We must find a way to provide those options for our Senior residents.
    I propose three solutions to this problem. First, a landbank that is created by the city to take the cost of the infill land and zoning process out of the equation and facilitate partnerships with the private sector to build Senior housing throughout Lexington, similar to the way UK has been building its new dormitories.
    Second, we must review our zoning and look at ways that would allow “grannie pods” in Lexington. This is a creative solution many other cities are utilizing that would allow Seniors to move in with their loved ones while maintaining safe and independent living. Third, we must find ways to incentivize businesses to rehire Seniors after retirement for those wanting to work. We have Seniors who are very skilled and have a lot to offer local businesses and we must find a way to connect them. This would also help with the current labor shortage in our city.
  • Skip Horine Did not complete questionnaire.
  • WIlliam Weyman Did not complete questionnaire.

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Urban County Council At-Large:

  • Harry Clarke– I am a member of that demographic. The options for our aging population include, among others, “aging in place,” joining an assisted living facility, and downsizing. Aging in place often demands significant alteration of the mortgage paid home to make it accessible and safe, but there is a void of interest in adjusting a home by builders, and the cost is unreasonably expensive. It is a fact that many seniors have considered adjusting their living by moving into a condo type facility with the same amenities as their original home, but smaller and more accessible. Unfortunately, many such facilities in Lexington, rather than providing downsizing in size and price, cost more than the home in which they live. Given the emphasis on infill, senior living facilities of quality without undue cost is one reasonable outcome of the infill projection.
    I would support action that would grandfather real estate taxes for seniors. There is no reason why the increase in home values need to increase the taxes our seniors pay and it would have minimal impact on the city’s income.
    We have a beautiful new senior citizens center that is used to capacity. One center is not enough to serve the large aging population among our 330,000 citizens and I would recommend a serious study for location and funding for an additional center in a completely different part of town. In addition to that, we have small community centers throughout the city that can be adapted for more logical use by our seniors, including programs similar to those in the Senior Citizens Center. Other concepts that need study include adapting our parks to better serve our seniors, improving the transportation system for seniors who no longer drive and increasing neighborhood programs designed especially for seniors. I do not support the idea of increasing density by adding new structures on existing single family residential lots.
  • Connie Kell Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Richard Moloney– Again, I supported the Goals and Objectives of the 2018 Comprehensive Plan, and there are specific recommendations for neighborhood design that will help the quality of life for our aging population. I do see a need for the development of more senior and assisted living facilities, and I will work with our Office of Affordable Housing to encourage development of housing options for middle and low income seniors.
  • Lillie E. Miller-Johnson– I would work for better housing for seniors, as well as, programs that will give them freedom o be all they can be at 65 and over, while they maintain there independence, come up with more ideals for social gathers as well, we are already providing housing with support staff as well.
  • Chuck Ellinger II.– My parents are both in their 80’s and I am witnessing this first hand. My father has Parkinson’s and his health is declining. My mom has been his sole health care provider, but it is becoming to big of task for her. We must provide the services so they can age gracefully and in a dignified way. We can look at zone changes that allow adapting ones house and property for aging parents and relatives. Lexington has been recognized as a community to retire in. We should continue to provide more senior living residences. Along with that, we need to make sure their basic needs ie. grocery store, pharmacy, retail, transportation, health care, etc. are met.
  • Todd Hamill– Lexington is going to have to make plans for additional senior centers in the future. Transportation is the largest issue in getting seniors out in general, and by diversifying locations, the impact of those challenges can be reduced. We are entering unknown territory with our senior population as well. Throughout the history of humankind, we have had situations where extended families were instrumental in the child-rearing, but we must be especially aware that the difference in grandparents raising children now is that it is happening in a technological transformation. While these changes impact everyone, our seniors may not have the frame of reference to guide children in this uncharted territory. This technological upheaval also creates frustration in many senior citizen’s daily routine. We must be attuned to that and find creative ways for the community to educate and support these new demands. As an administrative body, LFUCG cannot fulfill all those requirements. The council can coordinate the discussion with health care providers, educators, and social workers to allow the community to develop programs where it makes sense to connect to the population.
  • Matt Miniard– LEXINGTON’S AGING POPULATION GROWTH CAN BE ACCOMMODATED WITH NEW HIGH RISE DEVELOPMENTSAIDED AND FUNDED WITH TAX BREAKS AND INCENTIVES THUS REACHING MY GOAL OF SOCIAL EQUALITY BY PROVIDING AFFORABLE HOUSING FOR LEXINGTON AGING POPULATION.
  • Steve Kay– The city’s new Senior Center is a highly utilized facility that contributes to the mental and physical health of our senior citizens. Our Affordable Housing Fund will continue to be a major player in ensuring that existing affordable housing units for seniors remain affordable and new units are built. The Infill and Redevelopment subcommittee on Equitable Development includes a focus on mitigating the potential for infill development to displace long-term residents, many of whom are elderly. We need to focus more on strategies aimed at aging-in-place, and the creation of more robust support systems for the elderly. In addition, I support reviewing our existing zoning regulations for possible ways to allow increased densities that will make smaller and auxiliary housing units for the elderly possible.
  • Arnold L. Farr– Housing that is designed for the elderly should be readily available at an affordable price. I’m sure that we would need to increase the number of Assisted Living homes in the city. There is one thing that should be done now. There need to be more bus stops near places where many of our elderly citizens live. Those who depend on public transportation often have to walk too far. I got this information directly from some of our elderly citizens.
  • Adrian Wallace In Lexington, we need to ensure that we guarantee a high quality of life for all our residents. We must foster and cultivate a creative culture in the Horse Capital of the World that extends beyond just Keeneland and Bourbon, because we’re so much more. Our aging population can participate in and contribute to our cultural strength, though oftentimes face barriers such as affordable housing and transportation. The advent of suburban areas and automobiles harmed the ability for our elders to live in walkable spaces with easy access to community and amenities. Mixed use development with intentionality around density, diversity and affordability will be key to protecting our most vulnerable seniors while also truly building generational community.

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Urban County Council- 11th District:

  • Bill Swope– Support services should be identified that will assist seniors in finding affordable housing that is federally subsidized or provides tax credits, new housing units should offer design features that provide for independence. Grants and low interest loans should be provided for homeowners or builders that pursue renovation projects that make homes accessible for seniors.
  • Sandy Shafer– This is an infill and redevelopment issue, to age in place, to have affordable and suitable living accommodations near facilities that provide help, support, and comfort. We need more “tools” to provide and build housing, walking and biking paths for exercise, and access to basic services. Assistance for those with lower income, special needs, and minorities also need to be considered. “If one boat rises, they all rise….” Let’s lift the lowest boat….
  • Charles A. Lloyd– There needs to be easily accessible transportation to major places such as church, malls, hospitals, grocery stores, and will have to implement handicap upgrades to adjust for the population growth. New neighborhoods will need to have these things looked at from the start and not be after-thought. Sidewalks also need to be retro-installed due to poor planning.
  • Jennifer Reynolds– For me, it’s important to make sure that the whole city has easy access to affordable housing and important amenities no matter your age, race, gender, ethnicity, or sexual orientation. I would recommend that as we design new plans for our neighborhoods and city, we take all people into consideration, so that our roads and sidewalks are easily accessible and used by everyone. Gil Penalosa visited Lexington last year and discussed the 8 80 cities vision of creating safe and happy cities that prioritize everyone’s well-being, whether 8 years old or 80. As we develop we need to keep the senior citizen community in mind and make sure we are building housing that is specifically for that community similar to a place in my district, Christian Towers.
  • David Jones– Alternative Dwelling Units may be one of the single most important ideas to help this and I have been a long time proponent of those. Additionally, a multitude of housing options that are new and foreign to Lexington but have proven successful over time in other cities should be in the discussion as well.

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6. Fayette County agriculture is an annual $2.3 billion industry that supports one in twelve jobs in Lexington. Fayette County farmland is the factory-floor of this industry, which also anchors a burgeoning travel and tourism industry. To ensure continued viability of our agricultural industries, do you support an annual funding allocation to the Purchase of Development Rights Program? Why or why not. What other specific policies do you support to ensure the continued strength and growth of our agriculture industries?

Urban County Mayor:

  • Linda Gorton Yes, I support annual funding for the PDR program. I served on the Council when we passed the PDR ordinance in 2000 and understand its purpose and goals. I also am aware of the fact that the program is all about the land and being certain that our community has land, in perpetuity, for food and for other potential agricultural needs in the future. We must be proactive in seeking advanced agri-business, as well as growing our agricultural and equine clusters. I also served on the Council and voted in 1999 to support our Rural Land Management Plan, giving us the framework for planning and using our land going forward.
  • Ike Lawrence Again, we still have 2,500 acres untouched that is in the Urban Service Area (USA) that is available for factory and re-zoning. I like the up-zone from 10 to 40 acres minimum we did 20 years ago for the farms. And I support the 840 + 10 acre “farms” and their grandfather status. I feel it is unjust for PVA David O’Neill to take away the 10-acre status by stealing away the use of the land, i.e., land under house, barn and pool.
  • Teresa Isaac I certainly am a friend to our Bluegrass farmlands. During my tenure as Mayor, the PDR program grew exponentially. There were 4,000 acres on 26 farms when we started and after four years of my leadership, the program protected 17,000 acres on 150 farms. Our PDR program is a model that other states use to preserve farmlands and I believe it began with my team and leadership. I pride myself in being equitable which is also a pillar of the Fayette Alliance, so what I allocate to the PDR program, I also would allocate to the budget for affordable housing. I know how to strike a balance and am committed to preserve Lexington’s rolling landscapes yet offering modern state of the art living. I am a firm believer in building coalitions that represent all walks of life and create new ideas. To this end, I would appoint an agriculture representative to planning and zoning; add a position to the economic development office to handle agribusiness as well as add representatives of the farming community to the Lexington Visitors and Convention Board. These additions would ensure dialogue and result in growth for this industry.
  • Ronnie Bastin Support for the Purchase of Development Rights Program would continue under my administration as Mayor. The Urban Services Boundary is vital to protecting not only our farmland, but the future of our economy and quality of life. Beyond the importance of agriculture benefits, Fayette County farmland provides travelers and its citizens the experience of some of the most beautiful and unique scenery in the world. We must preserve this treasure.
    Agritourism has not reached its full potential. Lexington is in a great position to further enhance tourism by promoting the area as a family vacation destination.
    Vacation packaging to include unique tourism attractions (such as cheese making, aquaponics, horses, stockyards, parks museums, art exhibits, universities, architecture, wine, Toyota, bourbon, to name a few) is not yet fully developed. Lexington is also an easy drive from a significant portion of the US population. The landscape of a vibrant downtown continues to transform and will soon include a linear park, an improved convention center, Centre Point and Town Branch Park. Add the friendliest people in the world and our foodie scene with an abundance of farm to table restaurants and Lexington is poised to become more than just a great city to live in.
  • Kevin O. Stinnett I have supported the PDR program all 14 years on Council and feel it has done the job it set out to do and that’s to protect our Rural landscape. First, while I feel we have done a great job of protecting the land, we have not done a great job of protecting the horse industry and the industries in our rural areas. We must bring all Ag Industries to the table, not only the horse industry, and see how we can help them stay in business and stay in Fayette County. We recently did this with the Bluegrass Stockyards by offering an economic incentive. The cattle industry is very important to Lexington.
    Secondly, the horse is our brand and a signature that benefits all areas of economic development. We must find ways to keep that signature brand in Lexington and help it grow. Events at the Kentucky Horse Park, The Red Mile and Keeneland, all types of horse activities need to be supported. From day one as Mayor, I will bring everyone to the table to share and discuss ideas on funding, marketing, branding, etc.
    Third, we must continue to support current programs and help them grow, such as tourism and our local food program, while offering incentives to encourage alternative forms of agriculture production such as hemp and aquafarming.
  • Skip Horine Did not complete questionnaire.
  • William Weyman Did not complete questionnaire.

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Urban County Council At-Large:

  • Harry Clarke– I not only support annual funding allocation for PDR, but convinced the Council in my second year as a Councilmember to double the $1M to $2M city contribution, with the understanding that increase would still be matched by state/federal funding. I am concerned that there is no clear understanding of the impact of PDR on our land use and agriculture production among council members. I am equally concerned that PDR does not have the aggressive policies necessary to lobby for continued success. That may be manifest in the fact that PDR has a large balance that has given cause for the city to remove even the $1M in the 2019 budget. In order to ensure continued growth, it is important to continue to promote to the public the total impact of agriculture, beyond horses and general farming, and to stress the contribution to the local economy that pairs nicely with the economic pillars described in question number three. It may be true that what the public perceives, the city pursues.
  • Connie Kell Did not complete questionnaire.
  • Richard Moloney– I have supported funding of the PDR program for many budget cycles and I am proud of the success of the program; more than 30,000 acres protected towards a 50,000 acre goal! It has been an important program that ensures the viability of the agricultural sector of our economy, especially our signature horse industry. To name just a few, I supported the development of the Distillery District, the Local Food Coordinator program, the re-establishment of the Bluegrass Stockyards after their devastating fire, and I am a proponent of a permanent, indoor, year-long farmers’ market.
  • Lillie E. Miller-Johnson– Yes, I do; There is TDR, Cost Share Programs with the Soil and Water Conservation District which gives the owners of the property the chance to make improvements with reimbursement grants, engage students in learning about agriculture and other farming opportunities, probably introduce students to school to work opportunities, advertise more on Future farmers of America, enlist more minorities in agriculture while awarding students school credit for both classroom and on-the-job experience;
  • Chuck Ellinger II.– My record on the Council has been one of supporting the PDR program. We need to continue to support it and agri-business that helps sustain our economy. Lexington is very fortunate to be “The Horse Capital of the World”. We must preserve what makes us unique. Moreover, we must increase our focus on tourism to enhance Lexington-Fayette County as a premier tourist destination.
  • Todd Hamill– As the Horse Capital of the world centered in the Bluegrass State, Lexington deserves to cherish the rich landscape. The rural landscape is not only the crown jewel of our tourism industry, but also the factory floor of our agricultural industry. I do support public initiatives to maintain that beauty, as well as counter-balance with removing obstructions to redevelopment and infill within the Urban Services Boundary. We should also be marketing ourselves to global agricultural technology companies. Our educated workforce, the prime research facilities, and the agricultural landscape could allow an ideal synergy for these innovative industries. Lexington should be the global hub for Agricultural innovation. These industries are not going away as the global community looks for increased food production, environmental hardiness, and renewable resources to fulfill the demands of a growing population. Alltech has laid a successful blueprint, and we should make AgTech our coordinated mission. Finding ways to develop economic growth by preserving our resources becomes a winning combination for all of our citizens. The time for this type of development is now. We can start with the marketization of hemp products and removing barriers to the development of that industry.
  • Matt Miniard– I AM “NOT” IN FAVOR “PURCHASE OF DEVELOPMENT RIGHTS”; WE ARE CREATING FUTURE CIVIL RIGHTS SOCIAL PROBLEM; HEIGHTEN THE LEVEL OF, AND LACK, OF SOCIAL EQUALTY; WHEREBY THE 2018 COMPREHENSIVE PLAN, FALLS SHORT OF REACHING THE FUTURE GROWTH NEEDS, THIS CITY NEEDS TO GO UP NOT OUT ! IT GOING TO TAKE INCREASE INFRACTURE TO DO SO, INSTEAD OF PURCHASING DEVELOPMENT RIGHTS THE CITY SHOULD TAKE THAT FUNDING AND UPDATE ITS INFRACTURE HAVING GREATER SEWER CAPICITY INSIDE THE URBAN SERVICE AREA.
  • Steve Kay– I support annual funding for PDR. I have supported the PDR program since its inception and will continue supporting it. In my professional capacity I had the privilege of serving as facilitator for the informal multi-stakeholder group whose lengthy deliberations led to adoption of both the Rural Services Area and the PDR program. As a result, I am familiar with the background information and rationale that led to the wise decision to invest in protecting our valuable farm land. The program has been a success and should be continued. In addition, to strengthen the local food economy, I led efforts to establish the position of Local Food Coordinator in the Mayor’s Office for Economic Development.
  • Arnold L. Farr– I do support an annual funding allocation to the Purchase of Developmental Rights Program because as I said before, it is important that we protect our farms and the aesthetic integrity of the city.
  • Adrian Wallace– In order to continue funding the PDR program, I would want to see a reorganization of the Rural Land Management Board with intentionality and diversity to ensure equitable outcomes. Also, to most effectively protect the farmland outside of the Urban Services Boundary, the Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government must fund infrastructure and incentives for infill and redevelopment inside the boundary. Another key policy priority must be funding for Community Supported Agriculture programs that would provide access to affordable, fresh food to Lexington residents while also creating economic opportunity for Fayette County farmers.

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Urban County Council- 11th District:

  • Bill Swope– Budgets and funding are very fluid processes from year to year. In an effort to preserve PDR I would consider funding tied to a percentage of the total budget. I would also be amenable to tax credits for agribusiness job creation tied to wages above certain thesholds.
  • Sandy Shafer– This opening statement says it all! I supported the PDR program when it was created and will continue to do so. Our signature industry is tied to jobs throughout the Commonwealth! That, in turn, points to the need of having a PDR program with a permanent funding source to ensure growth and continued strength. This funding source should not just rely on local funding from the LFUCG. We must have the land mass to sustain this important land use that we are internationally known for! I would like a review of the zoning ordinance to consider removal of all non-agricultural related uses that could have a negative impact.
  • Charles A. Lloyd– Please see question question #2. I support agriculture and believe it is the backbone of Lexington and Ky. A persons land is their land, it is not Lexington’s land. If they wish to develop it then so be it. If they wish to not develop it, more power to them. As long as there is not a major ecological effect, then it is not the governments responsibility to interfere. The continued strength and growth of our agriculture industries would be best if the farmers where left alone!
  • Jennifer Reynolds– Yes, I support an annual funding allocation to the PDR Program from our local government because maintaining our farmland is part of what makes Lexington distinct and well known. I support policies that promote KY products and agriculture like Kentucky Proud, Local First, and Farm to Table initiatives. On a personal level I shop local whenever I can, I frequent the farmer’s market, and buy local products. When I eat out I eat at local restaurants. As councilwoman I will do everything in my power to make policies that further promote the growth of local agriculture and our local economy as a whole.
  • David Jones– I support annual funding of the PDR program provided it is to applicants who qualify under local, state and federal funds so that the city does not shoulder the sole burden of the program or any specific purchase. Just as I mentioned in question 3 I would support the same for the agriculture industries. I would also support more focus and expansion on the Horse Park and the role it plays in bringing outside visitors from all over the world as well as the economic impact it has locally.

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