We work hard to advocate for sustainable growth in Lexington-Fayette County. Here are some of our successes.

  1. Supported revoking a conditional use permit that allowed a commercial composting operation on Con Robinson’s farm off Georgetown Road. Under the guise of a “composting” permit, Mr. Robinson was operating an illegal rock quarrying mine on the site—causing significant environmental damage to the area, and jeopardizing planning and zoning laws on a countywide level. The Board of Adjustment revoked the permit.

    Read More
  2. Actively partnered with Fayette County Farm Bureau and the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture to complete an economic impact analysis of the “ag-cluster” in Fayette County. After nearly two years of study, the report found that agriculture has a $2.4 billion annual impact on our local economy and supports one in nine jobs in Lexington. Fayette Alliance continues to educate leaders at City Hall and beyond on the importance of ag-economic development in Fayette County, and the need to support it as the primary land-use in our rural areas. Work is ongoing.

    Read More
  3. Actively partnered with local government and community leaders to examine establishing an LFUCG Ag-Economic Development Commission—to advance ag-economic development policy in Lexington Fayette County. Such a body would provide the legislative component for “public-private” partnerships needed to promote economic development in various ag-sectors, including the equine industry, local food, general agriculture, tourism, research, and advanced manufacturing. Work is ongoing.

  4. Monitored the Zoning Ordinance Text Amendment Committee at LFUCG, to responsibly advance recreational opportunities in our productive and sensitive agricultural areas of Fayette County. Initial recommendations were issued in April 2013, and work to implement the recommendations is ongoing.

    Read More
  5. Served on Design Excellence Steering Committee at LFUCG, to advance design guidelines and development incentives for downtown Lexington. Recommendations will likely be reported late fall of 2013, and work is ongoing.

    Read More
  6. Requested the creation of an LFUCG citizen work-group to examine the feasibility of establishing a comprehensive, multi-modal trail along public thoroughfares in rural Fayette County. If done, Fayette County can explore how to balance recreational access with the liability and logistical needs of our signature livestock industries on farms. Work is ongoing.

  7. Supported the Notice of Violation and Revocation of the “Angler’s Club” conditional use permit at Boone Creek Outdoors, in South Eastern Fayette County. Under the permit, Mr. Carey conducted a commercial zip line and canopy tour operation without proper approval from the Board of Adjustment or the Fayette Circuit Court. The Board of Adjustment and LFUCG approved the revocation, and successfully secured a criminal injunction forcing Mr. Carey to cease operations until the Fayette Circuit Court resolves his pending appeals. This issue has broad legal implications on the enforcement of our zoning process and laws. This is very important, as planning and zoning creates real estate value in our community, and enables the co-existence of a vibrant city with the most productive and beautiful farmland in the world. Work is ongoing.

    Read More
  8. Supported a Zoning Ordinance Text Amendment, allowing hospice facilities in the “Economic Development” (ED) Zone of Fayette County. Planning Commission and Council adopted the legislation. With this policy in place, Lexington can improve its claim as an “Agriculture, Healthcare, and High tech” hub in the Bluegrass Region, by attracting new medical facilities to the community without disrupting neighborhoods and farms located next to ED zone.

    Read More
  9. Supported the FY 2014 LFUCG Budget. Council adopted the budget. Highlights included:

    • $2 million local match for the Purchase of Development Rights Program, which will preserve and promote the “factory floor” of Fayette County’s signature agricultural industry and iconic Bluegrass landscape.
    • $1.25 million local match to finance the schematic design of the Rupp Arena Arts and Entertainment District, which will be a catalytic project in downtown Lexington’s ongoing renaissance.
    • Allocations to repair the Historic Courthouse and Kentucky Theatre, which are community icons that contribute to Lexington’s civic pride and character.
    • Allocations to maintain greenways and improve parks in our neighborhoods, which are essential in advancing Lexington’s unique sense of community and quality of life.
  10. Supported the “Summit” Tax Increment Financing District (TIF)—which will use local tax revenues generated from the retail, commercial, and residential development to finance infrastructure improvements for the area. Council adopted the proposal. The Summit will use new-urban,mixed-use design principles to redevelop the old Fritz Farm on the corner of Man O’ War and Nicholasville Roads—which is a large underutilized piece of property in the suburbs of Lexington.The Summit represents a $92.5 million investment in Lexington, and plans to be open by 2015.

  11. Actively engaged and participated in the 2013 Comprehensive Plan Update, which is the blueprint for Lexington’s future growth and preservation areas. The policy recommendations of the plan give rise to all planning and zoning regulations in Fayette County.

    Read More
  12. Actively collaborated with Commerce Lexington and LFUCG to identify, incentivize, and use the thousands of acres of land already inside our Urban Services Area for economic and industrial development. If sustainably done, this effort will reduce the need to expand our city limits into farmland for growth in the future, and create value on vacant and blighted properties for Lexington’s benefit. Work is ongoing.

  13. Continue to work with Keeneland, SOIL, LFUCG, and other interested stakeholders to monitor the potential development plans of Bluegrass Airport—which, if implemented, may expand airport facilities and commercial uses into adjacent rural areas. Work is ongoing.

  14. Supported an ordinance that allows LFUCG inspectors to enter private property and fix illegal sewer connections—improving our poor water quality in Lexington. Council approved the ordinance.

  15. Supported the University of Kentucky’s “Creative Pathway and Portal” grant application to reclaim 800 feet of abandoned railroad on campus through trails, public art, and landscaping. Work is ongoing.

  16. Supported an ordinance for “Pedestrian Oriented Business Districts,” which allows for voluntary off-street parking reductions to promote downtown development. Council passed the ordinance.

  17. Supported a $1.5 million allocation for the Rupp Arena Arts & Entertainment District “feasibility study”—to determine the financial, infrastructure, and planning implications of the project moving forward. Council approved the allocation to match state investment for the project. The study is ongoing.

  18. Supported the 21c Tax Increment Financing District—which will use local payroll and property tax revenues generated by 21c to finance the infrastructure improvements needed for the project. Council ratified the proposal, and work is underway to open the museum-hotel in the iconic old First National building by 2015.

  19. Served on the LFUCG Capacity Assurance Program Committee—to establish a regulatory framework by which Lexington can continue to grow, while restoring needed treatment capacity in our ailing sewer system. The committee issued, and Council ratified nineteen recommendations to administer the program—which began in July 2013.

    Read More
  20. In 2013, Fayette Alliance opposed a cell tower application on a scenic byway in rural Fayette County—as it constituted an illegal subdivision of land. Planning Commission denied the application.

    Read More
  21. Monitored the LFUCG Environmental Quality Committee, and specifically its recommendations concerning the size and scope of a new sewer pump station at the Blue Sky Rural Activity Center—located off Athens-Boonesboro Road. Work is ongoing.

  22. In 2013, Fayette Alliance asked Urban County Council to allocate $500,000 of the $1.7 million Build America Bond to a hydrology study of downtown Lexington. It was determined that no budget amendment was required in order to move funds for expenditure for the Distillery District Hydrology Study. As a result no formal Council action was taken.

    Read More
  23. In 2013, supported a local $1 million “match” to the LFUCG Purchase of Development Rights Program in the FY 2013 budget process—to advance their important goal of conserving 50,000 acres of prime Fayette County farmland forever.

  24. Fayette Alliance supported legislation that allows historic house museums in rural Fayette County. The legislation was adopted by LFUCG on Dec. 6, 2010 and was crafted in a way that respected the pastoral setting that anchors our signature ag-industries.

    Read More
  25. Fayette Alliance supported a 48% increase in the sewer user fee for fiscal year 2009, and a 35% increase for fiscal year 2010. These measures will collectively generate an additional $24.6 million in the dedicated LFUCG sanitary sewer user fee fund. This money will directly pay for $130 million in badly needed infrastructure projects over the next four years. The Council adopted the measure.

    Read More
  26. In 2009, Fayette Alliance opposed Developer Richardson-Todds Road LLC request for a zone change of roughly 9 acres of land located at 2020 Russell Cave Road. The developer sought a change from Agricultural-Urban (A-U) to Expansion Area Residential-2 (EAR-2) in order to build 47 residential units. Ultimately, the LFUCG Planning Commission and Urban County Council denied the zone change due to the area’s significant environmental and infrastructural issues.

    Read More
  27. In 2009, Fayette Alliance supported a ZOTA text-amendment allowing green infrastructure and alternative water quality measures. These will allow the use of low-impact / green water quality measures to minimize the environmental impacts of land development.

    Read More
  28. On June 23rd 2009, the Council unanimously adopted the principles of the Downtown Masterplan. Fayette Alliance strongly supported the Downtown Masterplan, and continues to monitor discussions that will aid in its implementation.

    Read More
  29. In October 2009, LFUCG applied for $400,000 in federal funding to perform a community-wide brownfields assessment.  The Fayette Alliance endorsed LFUCG’s brownfield assessment grant application because it will improve Lexington’s quality of life potential.

    Read More
  30. In 2009, Fayette Alliance supported a text amendment to Article 1-11 of the Zoning Ordinance. It would have changed the definitions of a dwelling unit and an extended stay hotel to limit the time period for rental of residential dwelling units—allowing home rentals on a monthly basis or for a period between one week and one month (up to four times a year) in Fayette County.

    Read More
  31. In 2008, Fayette Alliance supported the ND-1 Overlay process as a measure to advance responsible infill redevelopment in Lexington–a core strategy in achieving farmland preservation in Fayette County.

    Read More
  32. Fayette Alliance supported the LFUCG Equine Task Force and recommended ways in which local government can actively support the horse business—from lobbying state government to change KY tax law, to continuing funding of the PDR program. On December 9th, 2008, the LFUCG Budget & Finance Committee officially adopted the recommendations.

    Read More
  33. During the 2006 Comprehensive Plan update the question of urban expansion was essential to the future of Lexington-Fayette County. Fayette Alliance opposed these proposals and any expansion of the Urban Service Area at the time because of our defunct infrastructure, the importance of our agricultural enterprises in Fayette County, the amount of vacant land within the current urban service area, and the need to revitalize our urban areas using innovative develpment practices. Ultimately, after months of public hearings, the Planning Commission made the courageous decision not to expand the Urban Services Boundary at the time.

    Read More
  34. In 2006, Fayette Alliance opposed Quest Church’s request for a zone change in the A-R zone that would have allowed it to build a 90,000 square foot worship facility next to Mill Ridge Farm.. LFUCG Council denied this request.

    Read More

« Back to Our Work

Events

No upcoming events. Check back soon or join our mailing list and get notified of future events.

Bluegrass International Cup